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Camera ready copy



 
 
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  #11  
Old February 23rd 05, 11:48 AM
Jezebel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

troff output .... now there's a glimmer from a murky past. Even the
hard-coded error messages were witty.


"Margaret Aldis" wrote in
message ...
LOL - this thread certainly brought back some memories :-). In the 1970s
ICL
provided cans of rubber cement for the odd occasions when the authors did
their own CRC. I can remember a colleague literally falling over in
hysterics at the end of a long afternoon pasting in pictures of data entry
forms. (I also remember when the cleaners, searching for coins or snacks
in
someone's top drawer, left a poorly lidded can on its side ... ).

When we got into CRC in a big way here in the 80s we quickly found that
sticking graphics into hundreds of pages of troff output and meeting
printers' deadlines demanded a proper scalpel, wax roller kit and a
home-made light box.

By that stage we had an artist producing graphics on the Mac and had left
the Rotring and the Letraset behind - I think the Letraset finally got
thrown out when it started spattering tiny shards in the drawer with the
slide rule!

--
Margaret Aldis - Microsoft Word MVP
Syntagma partnership site: http://www.syntagma.co.uk
Word MVP FAQ site: http://www.word.mvps.org

"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
I did this only in an amateurish sort of way. I used rubber cement, too,
though also flirted with glue sticks and spray adhesive and roll-on
adhesives of various sorts. It would have helped tremendously to have a
light box, something I acquired only after my need for it was largely
over
(I had to depend on eyeballing and windowpanes). But my paste-ups were
not
for CRC--just manuscripts.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup

so
all may benefit.

"Jezebel" wrote in message
...
Rubber cement was a buzz, indeed, (although I have grave doubts about

the
quality your cannabis!) ... but a waxing machine was what the pros all

used.

I'll bet your Letraset's lost all its serifs by now.




"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
You used wax? We used rubber cement -- almost as much fun as
cannabis!
We had a little photosetter for headlines, but we did use tons of
Letraset for labeling illustrations. I still have a box of it tucked
away under my desk (not far from the slide rule).

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org

On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 10:57:20 +1100, "Jezebel"
wrote:

Not nearly as much fun, though. Don't you miss the smell of wax, or

all
those hours spent Letrasetting the headings?



"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
.. .
In the "olden days" when I created documents on a typewriter, CRC

was
routinely "shot down" because typewriter text was large and
ungainly

and
illustrations that weren't necessarily perfect were enhanced by
reduction.
In those days, graphs, drawings, photographs, etc., had to be
pasted

up
on
the CRC. If you'd ever visited a newspaper or an ad agency, you

would
have
seen people "making up pages" in this way. Creating a document
using
page
layout software (or even word processing software such as Word) is
exponentially easier than it was in those days!

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the
newsgroup
so
all may benefit.

"C Tate" wrote in message
...
Thank you both very much indeed for such helpful replies. Is there
anything
I can refer to to learn even more about this? (It sounds like just
making
sure your document is perfect for the camera though there are

sometimes
other considerations such as the CRC being a fixed percentage

larger
than
the ultimate output).

"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
C Tate wrote:
Hope this doesn't seem a slightly off the wall question! But if
somebody asks for 'camera ready copy' in Word what exactly do

they
mean?!!!!

In offset printing (the cheapest, easiest method), someone uses
a
press
camera to take a picture of each original page. Through several

steps
the
negative from that camera is used to make printing plates that

apply
ink
to
sheets of paper. The original page is "camera ready" when it

contains
all
the text and graphics that should be in the final printing, and
nothing
else. (Technically, since the film in the press camera is

insensitive
to
light blue, it's possible to write comments on camera ready
pages
with
light
blue pencil. This is usually allowed only in the margins,

though.)
It
means
a spell-check has been done, all corrections have been made, all
fonts
and
formatting are in place, headers and footers are included, etc.

This isn't exclusively a Word thing -- in fact, once you've used

the
computer printer to put a Word document on paper, it doesn't

matter
whether
the pages came from Word or from Mars. In fact, I would never
say
that
a
document is "camera ready" while it exists only as an electronic
document.

The amount of work needed to convert camera ready copy into

printing
plates,
and the extra work and expense that may be needed to fix errors

after
that
stage, mean that you have to be very sure that everything is

right
before
you say the pages are "camera ready".

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org














Ads
  #12  
Old February 23rd 05, 02:52 PM
Suzanne S. Barnhill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

You make me quite envious. I was always intrigued by the way things were
done in proper setups, but I never had the equipment myself (or really any
need for it, since I was producing only MS). But my grandfather was a
printer, so I did get to have my name cast in Linotype every summer, wander
amongst the presses, play with the perforating machine, watch the folder
(whose operations were nothing short of miraculous, but too rapid to
fathom), and (as sternly warned) stay strictly clear of the guillotine.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
all may benefit.

"Margaret Aldis" wrote in
message ...
LOL - this thread certainly brought back some memories :-). In the 1970s

ICL
provided cans of rubber cement for the odd occasions when the authors did
their own CRC. I can remember a colleague literally falling over in
hysterics at the end of a long afternoon pasting in pictures of data entry
forms. (I also remember when the cleaners, searching for coins or snacks

in
someone's top drawer, left a poorly lidded can on its side ... ).

When we got into CRC in a big way here in the 80s we quickly found that
sticking graphics into hundreds of pages of troff output and meeting
printers' deadlines demanded a proper scalpel, wax roller kit and a
home-made light box.

By that stage we had an artist producing graphics on the Mac and had left
the Rotring and the Letraset behind - I think the Letraset finally got
thrown out when it started spattering tiny shards in the drawer with the
slide rule!

--
Margaret Aldis - Microsoft Word MVP
Syntagma partnership site: http://www.syntagma.co.uk
Word MVP FAQ site: http://www.word.mvps.org

"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
I did this only in an amateurish sort of way. I used rubber cement, too,
though also flirted with glue sticks and spray adhesive and roll-on
adhesives of various sorts. It would have helped tremendously to have a
light box, something I acquired only after my need for it was largely

over
(I had to depend on eyeballing and windowpanes). But my paste-ups were

not
for CRC--just manuscripts.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the

newsgroup
so
all may benefit.

"Jezebel" wrote in message
...
Rubber cement was a buzz, indeed, (although I have grave doubts about

the
quality your cannabis!) ... but a waxing machine was what the pros all

used.

I'll bet your Letraset's lost all its serifs by now.




"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
You used wax? We used rubber cement -- almost as much fun as

cannabis!
We had a little photosetter for headlines, but we did use tons of
Letraset for labeling illustrations. I still have a box of it tucked
away under my desk (not far from the slide rule).

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org

On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 10:57:20 +1100, "Jezebel"
wrote:

Not nearly as much fun, though. Don't you miss the smell of wax, or

all
those hours spent Letrasetting the headings?



"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
.. .
In the "olden days" when I created documents on a typewriter, CRC

was
routinely "shot down" because typewriter text was large and

ungainly
and
illustrations that weren't necessarily perfect were enhanced by
reduction.
In those days, graphs, drawings, photographs, etc., had to be

pasted
up
on
the CRC. If you'd ever visited a newspaper or an ad agency, you

would
have
seen people "making up pages" in this way. Creating a document

using
page
layout software (or even word processing software such as Word) is
exponentially easier than it was in those days!

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the
newsgroup
so
all may benefit.

"C Tate" wrote in message
...
Thank you both very much indeed for such helpful replies. Is

there
anything
I can refer to to learn even more about this? (It sounds like

just
making
sure your document is perfect for the camera though there are

sometimes
other considerations such as the CRC being a fixed percentage

larger
than
the ultimate output).

"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
C Tate wrote:
Hope this doesn't seem a slightly off the wall question! But

if
somebody asks for 'camera ready copy' in Word what exactly do

they
mean?!!!!

In offset printing (the cheapest, easiest method), someone uses

a
press
camera to take a picture of each original page. Through several

steps
the
negative from that camera is used to make printing plates that

apply
ink
to
sheets of paper. The original page is "camera ready" when it

contains
all
the text and graphics that should be in the final printing, and
nothing
else. (Technically, since the film in the press camera is

insensitive
to
light blue, it's possible to write comments on camera ready

pages
with
light
blue pencil. This is usually allowed only in the margins,

though.)
It
means
a spell-check has been done, all corrections have been made,

all
fonts
and
formatting are in place, headers and footers are included, etc.

This isn't exclusively a Word thing -- in fact, once you've

used
the
computer printer to put a Word document on paper, it doesn't

matter
whether
the pages came from Word or from Mars. In fact, I would never

say
that
a
document is "camera ready" while it exists only as an

electronic
document.

The amount of work needed to convert camera ready copy into

printing
plates,
and the extra work and expense that may be needed to fix errors

after
that
stage, mean that you have to be very sure that everything is

right
before
you say the pages are "camera ready".

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org













  #13  
Old February 23rd 05, 04:10 PM
Graham Mayor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

My grandfather (and father) was a printer also so I had the same childhood
experiences of wandering around his premises - and that guillotine used to
give me nightmares. Even today I would not wish to go near such a device
50 years on and I can still smell the hot lead, ink and paper dust. Happy
days

--

Graham Mayor - Word MVP

My web site www.gmayor.com
Word MVP web site http://word.mvps.org




Suzanne S. Barnhill wrote:
You make me quite envious. I was always intrigued by the way things
were done in proper setups, but I never had the equipment myself (or
really any need for it, since I was producing only MS). But my
grandfather was a printer, so I did get to have my name cast in
Linotype every summer, wander amongst the presses, play with the
perforating machine, watch the folder (whose operations were nothing
short of miraculous, but too rapid to fathom), and (as sternly
warned) stay strictly clear of the guillotine.


"Margaret Aldis" wrote
in message ...
LOL - this thread certainly brought back some memories :-). In the
1970s ICL provided cans of rubber cement for the odd occasions when
the authors did their own CRC. I can remember a colleague literally
falling over in hysterics at the end of a long afternoon pasting in
pictures of data entry forms. (I also remember when the cleaners,
searching for coins or snacks in someone's top drawer, left a poorly
lidded can on its side ... ).

When we got into CRC in a big way here in the 80s we quickly found
that sticking graphics into hundreds of pages of troff output and
meeting printers' deadlines demanded a proper scalpel, wax roller
kit and a home-made light box.

By that stage we had an artist producing graphics on the Mac and had
left the Rotring and the Letraset behind - I think the Letraset
finally got thrown out when it started spattering tiny shards in the
drawer with the slide rule!

--
Margaret Aldis - Microsoft Word MVP
Syntagma partnership site: http://www.syntagma.co.uk
Word MVP FAQ site: http://www.word.mvps.org

"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
I did this only in an amateurish sort of way. I used rubber cement,
too, though also flirted with glue sticks and spray adhesive and
roll-on adhesives of various sorts. It would have helped
tremendously to have a light box, something I acquired only after
my need for it was largely over (I had to depend on eyeballing and
windowpanes). But my paste-ups were not for CRC--just manuscripts.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the
newsgroup so all may benefit.

"Jezebel" wrote in message
...
Rubber cement was a buzz, indeed, (although I have grave doubts
about the quality your cannabis!) ... but a waxing machine was
what the pros all used.

I'll bet your Letraset's lost all its serifs by now.




"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
You used wax? We used rubber cement -- almost as much fun as
cannabis! We had a little photosetter for headlines, but we did
use tons of Letraset for labeling illustrations. I still have a
box of it tucked away under my desk (not far from the slide rule).

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org

On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 10:57:20 +1100, "Jezebel"
wrote:

Not nearly as much fun, though. Don't you miss the smell of wax,
or all those hours spent Letrasetting the headings?



"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
In the "olden days" when I created documents on a typewriter,
CRC was routinely "shot down" because typewriter text was large
and ungainly and illustrations that weren't necessarily perfect
were enhanced by reduction.
In those days, graphs, drawings, photographs, etc., had to be
pasted up on
the CRC. If you'd ever visited a newspaper or an ad agency, you
would have
seen people "making up pages" in this way. Creating a document
using page
layout software (or even word processing software such as Word)
is exponentially easier than it was in those days!

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the
newsgroup
so
all may benefit.

"C Tate" wrote in
message ...
Thank you both very much indeed for such helpful replies. Is
there anything I can refer to to learn even more about this?
(It sounds like just making
sure your document is perfect for the camera though there are
sometimes other considerations such as the CRC being a fixed
percentage larger than
the ultimate output).

"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
C Tate wrote:
Hope this doesn't seem a slightly off the wall question! But
if somebody asks for 'camera ready copy' in Word what
exactly do they mean?!!!!

In offset printing (the cheapest, easiest method), someone
uses a press
camera to take a picture of each original page. Through
several steps the negative from that camera is used to make
printing plates that apply ink
to
sheets of paper. The original page is "camera ready" when it
contains all the text and graphics that should be in the
final printing, and nothing
else. (Technically, since the film in the press camera is
insensitive to
light blue, it's possible to write comments on camera ready
pages with
light
blue pencil. This is usually allowed only in the margins,
though.) It means
a spell-check has been done, all corrections have been made,
all fonts
and
formatting are in place, headers and footers are included,
etc.

This isn't exclusively a Word thing -- in fact, once you've
used the computer printer to put a Word document on paper, it
doesn't matter whether
the pages came from Word or from Mars. In fact, I would never
say that
a
document is "camera ready" while it exists only as an
electronic document.

The amount of work needed to convert camera ready copy into
printing plates,
and the extra work and expense that may be needed to fix
errors after that stage, mean that you have to be very sure
that everything is right before you say the pages are "camera
ready".

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org



  #14  
Old February 23rd 05, 05:38 PM
Suzanne S. Barnhill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Well, the printer I use now has this wonderfully computerized guillotine
that I am happy to watch him use. It has all kinds of modern OSHA-approved
safety protections, of course.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
all may benefit.

"Graham Mayor" wrote in message
...
My grandfather (and father) was a printer also so I had the same childhood
experiences of wandering around his premises - and that guillotine used to
give me nightmares. Even today I would not wish to go near such a device


50 years on and I can still smell the hot lead, ink and paper dust. Happy
days

--

Graham Mayor - Word MVP

My web site www.gmayor.com
Word MVP web site http://word.mvps.org




Suzanne S. Barnhill wrote:
You make me quite envious. I was always intrigued by the way things
were done in proper setups, but I never had the equipment myself (or
really any need for it, since I was producing only MS). But my
grandfather was a printer, so I did get to have my name cast in
Linotype every summer, wander amongst the presses, play with the
perforating machine, watch the folder (whose operations were nothing
short of miraculous, but too rapid to fathom), and (as sternly
warned) stay strictly clear of the guillotine.


"Margaret Aldis" wrote
in message ...
LOL - this thread certainly brought back some memories :-). In the
1970s ICL provided cans of rubber cement for the odd occasions when
the authors did their own CRC. I can remember a colleague literally
falling over in hysterics at the end of a long afternoon pasting in
pictures of data entry forms. (I also remember when the cleaners,
searching for coins or snacks in someone's top drawer, left a poorly
lidded can on its side ... ).

When we got into CRC in a big way here in the 80s we quickly found
that sticking graphics into hundreds of pages of troff output and
meeting printers' deadlines demanded a proper scalpel, wax roller
kit and a home-made light box.

By that stage we had an artist producing graphics on the Mac and had
left the Rotring and the Letraset behind - I think the Letraset
finally got thrown out when it started spattering tiny shards in the
drawer with the slide rule!

--
Margaret Aldis - Microsoft Word MVP
Syntagma partnership site: http://www.syntagma.co.uk
Word MVP FAQ site: http://www.word.mvps.org

"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
I did this only in an amateurish sort of way. I used rubber cement,
too, though also flirted with glue sticks and spray adhesive and
roll-on adhesives of various sorts. It would have helped
tremendously to have a light box, something I acquired only after
my need for it was largely over (I had to depend on eyeballing and
windowpanes). But my paste-ups were not for CRC--just manuscripts.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the
newsgroup so all may benefit.

"Jezebel" wrote in message
...
Rubber cement was a buzz, indeed, (although I have grave doubts
about the quality your cannabis!) ... but a waxing machine was
what the pros all used.

I'll bet your Letraset's lost all its serifs by now.




"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
You used wax? We used rubber cement -- almost as much fun as
cannabis! We had a little photosetter for headlines, but we did
use tons of Letraset for labeling illustrations. I still have a
box of it tucked away under my desk (not far from the slide rule).

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org

On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 10:57:20 +1100, "Jezebel"
wrote:

Not nearly as much fun, though. Don't you miss the smell of wax,
or all those hours spent Letrasetting the headings?



"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
In the "olden days" when I created documents on a typewriter,
CRC was routinely "shot down" because typewriter text was large
and ungainly and illustrations that weren't necessarily perfect
were enhanced by reduction.
In those days, graphs, drawings, photographs, etc., had to be
pasted up on
the CRC. If you'd ever visited a newspaper or an ad agency, you
would have
seen people "making up pages" in this way. Creating a document
using page
layout software (or even word processing software such as Word)
is exponentially easier than it was in those days!

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the
newsgroup
so
all may benefit.

"C Tate" wrote in
message ...
Thank you both very much indeed for such helpful replies. Is
there anything I can refer to to learn even more about this?
(It sounds like just making
sure your document is perfect for the camera though there are
sometimes other considerations such as the CRC being a fixed
percentage larger than
the ultimate output).

"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
C Tate wrote:
Hope this doesn't seem a slightly off the wall question! But
if somebody asks for 'camera ready copy' in Word what
exactly do they mean?!!!!

In offset printing (the cheapest, easiest method), someone
uses a press
camera to take a picture of each original page. Through
several steps the negative from that camera is used to make
printing plates that apply ink
to
sheets of paper. The original page is "camera ready" when it
contains all the text and graphics that should be in the
final printing, and nothing
else. (Technically, since the film in the press camera is
insensitive to
light blue, it's possible to write comments on camera ready
pages with
light
blue pencil. This is usually allowed only in the margins,
though.) It means
a spell-check has been done, all corrections have been made,
all fonts
and
formatting are in place, headers and footers are included,
etc.

This isn't exclusively a Word thing -- in fact, once you've
used the computer printer to put a Word document on paper, it
doesn't matter whether
the pages came from Word or from Mars. In fact, I would never
say that
a
document is "camera ready" while it exists only as an
electronic document.

The amount of work needed to convert camera ready copy into
printing plates,
and the extra work and expense that may be needed to fix
errors after that stage, mean that you have to be very sure
that everything is right before you say the pages are "camera
ready".

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org




  #15  
Old February 23rd 05, 05:50 PM
Margaret Aldis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Now you are making me envious ;-) I think ICL was still on hot type for the
manuals printed 'properly' (as opposed to rubber glued masters for short
runs) when I first joined, but I didn't ever get to see the print works. (If
things were urgent enough, authors travelled to Letchworth to do their page
proofing and indexing while the presses waited, but mine all had relatively
leisurely turn round.)

As far as a proper equipment was concerned - well, we did find the wax
roller a really worthwhile investment, but the 'studio' was a converted
outhouse, the cutting board borrowed from the kitchen, and the working bench
the top of the chest freezer ;-)

--
Margaret Aldis - Microsoft Word MVP
Syntagma partnership site: http://www.syntagma.co.uk
Word MVP FAQ site: http://www.word.mvps.org

"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
You make me quite envious. I was always intrigued by the way things were
done in proper setups, but I never had the equipment myself (or really any
need for it, since I was producing only MS). But my grandfather was a
printer, so I did get to have my name cast in Linotype every summer,

wander
amongst the presses, play with the perforating machine, watch the folder
(whose operations were nothing short of miraculous, but too rapid to
fathom), and (as sternly warned) stay strictly clear of the guillotine.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup

so
all may benefit.

"Margaret Aldis" wrote in
message ...
LOL - this thread certainly brought back some memories :-). In the 1970s

ICL
provided cans of rubber cement for the odd occasions when the authors

did
their own CRC. I can remember a colleague literally falling over in
hysterics at the end of a long afternoon pasting in pictures of data

entry
forms. (I also remember when the cleaners, searching for coins or snacks

in
someone's top drawer, left a poorly lidded can on its side ... ).

When we got into CRC in a big way here in the 80s we quickly found that
sticking graphics into hundreds of pages of troff output and meeting
printers' deadlines demanded a proper scalpel, wax roller kit and a
home-made light box.

By that stage we had an artist producing graphics on the Mac and had

left
the Rotring and the Letraset behind - I think the Letraset finally got
thrown out when it started spattering tiny shards in the drawer with the
slide rule!

--
Margaret Aldis - Microsoft Word MVP
Syntagma partnership site: http://www.syntagma.co.uk
Word MVP FAQ site: http://www.word.mvps.org

"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
I did this only in an amateurish sort of way. I used rubber cement,

too,
though also flirted with glue sticks and spray adhesive and roll-on
adhesives of various sorts. It would have helped tremendously to have

a
light box, something I acquired only after my need for it was largely

over
(I had to depend on eyeballing and windowpanes). But my paste-ups were

not
for CRC--just manuscripts.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the

newsgroup
so
all may benefit.

"Jezebel" wrote in message
...
Rubber cement was a buzz, indeed, (although I have grave doubts

about
the
quality your cannabis!) ... but a waxing machine was what the pros

all
used.

I'll bet your Letraset's lost all its serifs by now.




"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
You used wax? We used rubber cement -- almost as much fun as

cannabis!
We had a little photosetter for headlines, but we did use tons of
Letraset for labeling illustrations. I still have a box of it

tucked
away under my desk (not far from the slide rule).

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org

On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 10:57:20 +1100, "Jezebel"
wrote:

Not nearly as much fun, though. Don't you miss the smell of wax,

or
all
those hours spent Letrasetting the headings?



"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
.. .
In the "olden days" when I created documents on a typewriter,

CRC
was
routinely "shot down" because typewriter text was large and

ungainly
and
illustrations that weren't necessarily perfect were enhanced by
reduction.
In those days, graphs, drawings, photographs, etc., had to be

pasted
up
on
the CRC. If you'd ever visited a newspaper or an ad agency, you

would
have
seen people "making up pages" in this way. Creating a document

using
page
layout software (or even word processing software such as Word)

is
exponentially easier than it was in those days!

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the
newsgroup
so
all may benefit.

"C Tate" wrote in

message
...
Thank you both very much indeed for such helpful replies. Is

there
anything
I can refer to to learn even more about this? (It sounds like

just
making
sure your document is perfect for the camera though there are
sometimes
other considerations such as the CRC being a fixed percentage

larger
than
the ultimate output).

"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
C Tate wrote:
Hope this doesn't seem a slightly off the wall question! But

if
somebody asks for 'camera ready copy' in Word what exactly

do
they
mean?!!!!

In offset printing (the cheapest, easiest method), someone

uses
a
press
camera to take a picture of each original page. Through

several
steps
the
negative from that camera is used to make printing plates

that
apply
ink
to
sheets of paper. The original page is "camera ready" when it
contains
all
the text and graphics that should be in the final printing,

and
nothing
else. (Technically, since the film in the press camera is
insensitive
to
light blue, it's possible to write comments on camera ready

pages
with
light
blue pencil. This is usually allowed only in the margins,

though.)
It
means
a spell-check has been done, all corrections have been made,

all
fonts
and
formatting are in place, headers and footers are included,

etc.

This isn't exclusively a Word thing -- in fact, once you've

used
the
computer printer to put a Word document on paper, it doesn't

matter
whether
the pages came from Word or from Mars. In fact, I would never

say
that
a
document is "camera ready" while it exists only as an

electronic
document.

The amount of work needed to convert camera ready copy into
printing
plates,
and the extra work and expense that may be needed to fix

errors
after
that
stage, mean that you have to be very sure that everything is

right
before
you say the pages are "camera ready".

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org















  #16  
Old February 23rd 05, 10:26 PM
C Tate
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

And there was me thinking I had asked a dumb question!
"Margaret Aldis" wrote in
message ...
Now you are making me envious ;-) I think ICL was still on hot type for
the
manuals printed 'properly' (as opposed to rubber glued masters for short
runs) when I first joined, but I didn't ever get to see the print works.
(If
things were urgent enough, authors travelled to Letchworth to do their
page
proofing and indexing while the presses waited, but mine all had
relatively
leisurely turn round.)

As far as a proper equipment was concerned - well, we did find the wax
roller a really worthwhile investment, but the 'studio' was a converted
outhouse, the cutting board borrowed from the kitchen, and the working
bench
the top of the chest freezer ;-)

--
Margaret Aldis - Microsoft Word MVP
Syntagma partnership site: http://www.syntagma.co.uk
Word MVP FAQ site: http://www.word.mvps.org

"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
You make me quite envious. I was always intrigued by the way things were
done in proper setups, but I never had the equipment myself (or really
any
need for it, since I was producing only MS). But my grandfather was a
printer, so I did get to have my name cast in Linotype every summer,

wander
amongst the presses, play with the perforating machine, watch the folder
(whose operations were nothing short of miraculous, but too rapid to
fathom), and (as sternly warned) stay strictly clear of the guillotine.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup

so
all may benefit.

"Margaret Aldis" wrote in
message ...
LOL - this thread certainly brought back some memories :-). In the
1970s

ICL
provided cans of rubber cement for the odd occasions when the authors

did
their own CRC. I can remember a colleague literally falling over in
hysterics at the end of a long afternoon pasting in pictures of data

entry
forms. (I also remember when the cleaners, searching for coins or
snacks

in
someone's top drawer, left a poorly lidded can on its side ... ).

When we got into CRC in a big way here in the 80s we quickly found that
sticking graphics into hundreds of pages of troff output and meeting
printers' deadlines demanded a proper scalpel, wax roller kit and a
home-made light box.

By that stage we had an artist producing graphics on the Mac and had

left
the Rotring and the Letraset behind - I think the Letraset finally got
thrown out when it started spattering tiny shards in the drawer with
the
slide rule!

--
Margaret Aldis - Microsoft Word MVP
Syntagma partnership site: http://www.syntagma.co.uk
Word MVP FAQ site: http://www.word.mvps.org

"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
I did this only in an amateurish sort of way. I used rubber cement,

too,
though also flirted with glue sticks and spray adhesive and roll-on
adhesives of various sorts. It would have helped tremendously to have

a
light box, something I acquired only after my need for it was largely

over
(I had to depend on eyeballing and windowpanes). But my paste-ups
were

not
for CRC--just manuscripts.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the

newsgroup
so
all may benefit.

"Jezebel" wrote in message
...
Rubber cement was a buzz, indeed, (although I have grave doubts

about
the
quality your cannabis!) ... but a waxing machine was what the pros

all
used.

I'll bet your Letraset's lost all its serifs by now.




"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
You used wax? We used rubber cement -- almost as much fun as

cannabis!
We had a little photosetter for headlines, but we did use tons of
Letraset for labeling illustrations. I still have a box of it

tucked
away under my desk (not far from the slide rule).

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org

On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 10:57:20 +1100, "Jezebel"
wrote:

Not nearly as much fun, though. Don't you miss the smell of wax,

or
all
those hours spent Letrasetting the headings?



"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
.. .
In the "olden days" when I created documents on a typewriter,

CRC
was
routinely "shot down" because typewriter text was large and

ungainly
and
illustrations that weren't necessarily perfect were enhanced by
reduction.
In those days, graphs, drawings, photographs, etc., had to be

pasted
up
on
the CRC. If you'd ever visited a newspaper or an ad agency, you
would
have
seen people "making up pages" in this way. Creating a document

using
page
layout software (or even word processing software such as Word)

is
exponentially easier than it was in those days!

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the
newsgroup
so
all may benefit.

"C Tate" wrote in

message
...
Thank you both very much indeed for such helpful replies. Is

there
anything
I can refer to to learn even more about this? (It sounds like

just
making
sure your document is perfect for the camera though there are
sometimes
other considerations such as the CRC being a fixed percentage
larger
than
the ultimate output).

"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
C Tate wrote:
Hope this doesn't seem a slightly off the wall question!
But

if
somebody asks for 'camera ready copy' in Word what exactly

do
they
mean?!!!!

In offset printing (the cheapest, easiest method), someone

uses
a
press
camera to take a picture of each original page. Through

several
steps
the
negative from that camera is used to make printing plates

that
apply
ink
to
sheets of paper. The original page is "camera ready" when it
contains
all
the text and graphics that should be in the final printing,

and
nothing
else. (Technically, since the film in the press camera is
insensitive
to
light blue, it's possible to write comments on camera ready

pages
with
light
blue pencil. This is usually allowed only in the margins,
though.)
It
means
a spell-check has been done, all corrections have been made,

all
fonts
and
formatting are in place, headers and footers are included,

etc.

This isn't exclusively a Word thing -- in fact, once you've

used
the
computer printer to put a Word document on paper, it doesn't
matter
whether
the pages came from Word or from Mars. In fact, I would
never

say
that
a
document is "camera ready" while it exists only as an

electronic
document.

The amount of work needed to convert camera ready copy into
printing
plates,
and the extra work and expense that may be needed to fix

errors
after
that
stage, mean that you have to be very sure that everything is
right
before
you say the pages are "camera ready".

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org

















  #17  
Old March 16th 21, 09:03 AM
Laurence40 Laurence40 is offline
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First recorded activity by WordBanter: Feb 2021
Posts: 2
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