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Macro Security



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 20th 05, 02:05 PM
JD
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Macro Security

I'm confused about this issue. I read the following in Word Help:
Security Because macros can contain viruses, be careful about running them.
Take the following precautions: run up-to-date antivirus software on your
computer; set your macro security level to high; clear the Trust all
installed add-ins and templates check box; use digital signatures; maintain
a list of trusted publishers.

It also instructed me how to "remove" a macro publisher from the Trusted
list.

So I cleared the indicated checkbox and deleted two "trusted publishers,"
(both Gateway and both "expired"). Then when I opened an old document I got
a pop-up asking if I wanted to enable or disable a macro that this document
"contained." It suggested that if I "disabled," I might have trouble with
the document. So I clicke "enable." The "publisher" in this case was
Microsoft--though the permission installed showed that it "expired" in
November, 2003!

My question is, since I know nothing of macros and have no interest in using
them, is it safe for me to refuse to accept any?


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  #2  
Old April 20th 05, 03:49 PM
Jay Freedman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi JD,

It's always "safe" to refuse to accept any macros. The tradeoff is
that you will lose any functionality provided by macros that really
are safe to run.

In my opinion, the extreme paranoia about macro viruses expressed by
the Help is unwarranted. The expletive deleted lowlifes who delight
in others' misery seem to have discovered that hacking Internet
Explorer is easier or more satisfying than messing with Office macros.
Running antivirus software that looks for virus signatures is less
intrusive than summarily disabling all macros. If the idea of the
faint possibility of a macro virus bothers you, though, feel free to
block macros.

There are a few things you can accomplish in Word only by using a
macro. These are rare, and if you find that you need them you can
enable them each time.

You may run into trouble with third-party software that tries to
integrate with Office by supplying macros in global templates. By
disabling their macros, you lose that integration. You may see toolbar
buttons that don't do anything when clicked, etc.

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org

On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 06:05:15 -0700, "JD" wrote:

I'm confused about this issue. I read the following in Word Help:
Security Because macros can contain viruses, be careful about running them.
Take the following precautions: run up-to-date antivirus software on your
computer; set your macro security level to high; clear the Trust all
installed add-ins and templates check box; use digital signatures; maintain
a list of trusted publishers.

It also instructed me how to "remove" a macro publisher from the Trusted
list.

So I cleared the indicated checkbox and deleted two "trusted publishers,"
(both Gateway and both "expired"). Then when I opened an old document I got
a pop-up asking if I wanted to enable or disable a macro that this document
"contained." It suggested that if I "disabled," I might have trouble with
the document. So I clicke "enable." The "publisher" in this case was
Microsoft--though the permission installed showed that it "expired" in
November, 2003!

My question is, since I know nothing of macros and have no interest in using
them, is it safe for me to refuse to accept any?


  #3  
Old April 20th 05, 11:17 PM
JD
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks Jay. I'm still wondering why I am offered the choice of "enabling" a
macro published by Microsoft in a document that I created a long time ago
and that has never been off of this computer. I think of macros as bits of
code written to make Word do things that it doesn't normally do. Is that
correct? If so, I don't know why I would want or need any macros to run in
any of my Word documents. I'm not on a network, though I do occasionally
send them to friends and relatives.
The fact the the document which prompted this post was found to contain two
macros published by Gateway (my computer brand) makes me wonder why they
were there. And also, since I "removed" them, have I crippled my computer in
some way?
Also, if I may further impose, what is the significance of the "expiration
date" on these macros? All that I have seen are "expired" in 2003!
And finally, does the acceptance or rejection of macros apply on a per
document basis? That is to say that if I refuse a macro, will that apply
only to the document currently open or to all of my documents, present and
future? I guess I'm leery about making a decision that I barely understand
and that might be irreversible.
Thanks for you help. It is greatly appreciated.
"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
Hi JD,
It's always "safe" to refuse to accept any macros. The tradeoff is that
you will lose any functionality provided by macros that really are safe to
run.
In my opinion, the extreme paranoia about macro viruses expressed by the
Help is unwarranted. The expletive deleted lowlifes who delight in
others' misery seem to have discovered that hacking Internet Explorer is
easier or more satisfying than messing with Office macros. Running
antivirus software that looks for virus signatures is less intrusive than
summarily disabling all macros. If the idea of the faint possibility of a
macro virus bothers you, though, feel free to block macros.

There are a few things you can accomplish in Word only by using a macro.
These are rare, and if you find that you need them you can enable them each
time.
You may run into trouble with third-party software that tries to integrate
with Office by supplying macros in global templates. By disabling their
macros, you lose that integration. You may see toolbar buttons that don't do
anything when clicked, etc.
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org

On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 06:05:15 -0700, "JD" wrote:

I'm confused about this issue. I read the following in Word Help:
Security Because macros can contain viruses, be careful about running
them.
Take the following precautions: run up-to-date antivirus software on your
computer; set your macro security level to high; clear the Trust all
installed add-ins and templates check box; use digital signatures;
maintain
a list of trusted publishers.

It also instructed me how to "remove" a macro publisher from the Trusted
list.

So I cleared the indicated checkbox and deleted two "trusted publishers,"
(both Gateway and both "expired"). Then when I opened an old document I
got
a pop-up asking if I wanted to enable or disable a macro that this
document
"contained." It suggested that if I "disabled," I might have trouble with
the document. So I clicke "enable." The "publisher" in this case was
Microsoft--though the permission installed showed that it "expired" in
November, 2003!

My question is, since I know nothing of macros and have no interest in
using
them, is it safe for me to refuse to accept any?




  #4  
Old April 21st 05, 12:28 AM
Suzanne S. Barnhill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

FWIW, I found that a keyboard shortcut saved in a document will be tagged as
a "macro," and you'll get the warning dialog for it.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
all may benefit.

"JD" wrote in message
...
Thanks Jay. I'm still wondering why I am offered the choice of "enabling"

a
macro published by Microsoft in a document that I created a long time ago
and that has never been off of this computer. I think of macros as bits of
code written to make Word do things that it doesn't normally do. Is that
correct? If so, I don't know why I would want or need any macros to run in
any of my Word documents. I'm not on a network, though I do occasionally
send them to friends and relatives.
The fact the the document which prompted this post was found to contain

two
macros published by Gateway (my computer brand) makes me wonder why they
were there. And also, since I "removed" them, have I crippled my computer

in
some way?
Also, if I may further impose, what is the significance of the "expiration
date" on these macros? All that I have seen are "expired" in 2003!
And finally, does the acceptance or rejection of macros apply on a per
document basis? That is to say that if I refuse a macro, will that apply
only to the document currently open or to all of my documents, present and
future? I guess I'm leery about making a decision that I barely understand
and that might be irreversible.
Thanks for you help. It is greatly appreciated.
"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
Hi JD,
It's always "safe" to refuse to accept any macros. The tradeoff is that
you will lose any functionality provided by macros that really are safe

to
run.
In my opinion, the extreme paranoia about macro viruses expressed by the
Help is unwarranted. The expletive deleted lowlifes who delight in
others' misery seem to have discovered that hacking Internet Explorer is
easier or more satisfying than messing with Office macros. Running
antivirus software that looks for virus signatures is less intrusive

than
summarily disabling all macros. If the idea of the faint possibility of

a
macro virus bothers you, though, feel free to block macros.

There are a few things you can accomplish in Word only by using a macro.
These are rare, and if you find that you need them you can enable them

each
time.
You may run into trouble with third-party software that tries to integrate
with Office by supplying macros in global templates. By disabling their
macros, you lose that integration. You may see toolbar buttons that don't

do
anything when clicked, etc.
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org

On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 06:05:15 -0700, "JD" wrote:

I'm confused about this issue. I read the following in Word Help:
Security Because macros can contain viruses, be careful about running
them.
Take the following precautions: run up-to-date antivirus software on

your
computer; set your macro security level to high; clear the Trust all
installed add-ins and templates check box; use digital signatures;
maintain
a list of trusted publishers.

It also instructed me how to "remove" a macro publisher from the Trusted
list.

So I cleared the indicated checkbox and deleted two "trusted

publishers,"
(both Gateway and both "expired"). Then when I opened an old document I
got
a pop-up asking if I wanted to enable or disable a macro that this
document
"contained." It suggested that if I "disabled," I might have trouble

with
the document. So I clicke "enable." The "publisher" in this case was
Microsoft--though the permission installed showed that it "expired" in
November, 2003!

My question is, since I know nothing of macros and have no interest in
using
them, is it safe for me to refuse to accept any?





  #5  
Old April 21st 05, 12:49 AM
JD
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

How very interesting. I guess the moral of the story is that I should go
ahead and "accept" macros offered from "trusted publishers," most certainly
from Microsoft.
Upon reflection, I have to admit that I really don't know how a keyboard
shortcut would be "saved in a document." Is this something like "embedding
fonts," which applies only to one document and not to all the others on my
hard drive?
"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
FWIW, I found that a keyboard shortcut saved in a document will be tagged
as a "macro," and you'll get the warning dialog for it.
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup
so
all may benefit.

"JD" wrote in message
...
Thanks Jay. I'm still wondering why I am offered the choice of "enabling"

a
macro published by Microsoft in a document that I created a long time ago
and that has never been off of this computer. I think of macros as bits
of
code written to make Word do things that it doesn't normally do. Is that
correct? If so, I don't know why I would want or need any macros to run
in
any of my Word documents. I'm not on a network, though I do occasionally
send them to friends and relatives.
The fact the the document which prompted this post was found to contain

two
macros published by Gateway (my computer brand) makes me wonder why they
were there. And also, since I "removed" them, have I crippled my computer

in
some way?
Also, if I may further impose, what is the significance of the
"expiration
date" on these macros? All that I have seen are "expired" in 2003!
And finally, does the acceptance or rejection of macros apply on a per
document basis? That is to say that if I refuse a macro, will that apply
only to the document currently open or to all of my documents, present
and
future? I guess I'm leery about making a decision that I barely
understand
and that might be irreversible.
Thanks for you help. It is greatly appreciated.
"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
Hi JD,
It's always "safe" to refuse to accept any macros. The tradeoff is that
you will lose any functionality provided by macros that really are safe

to
run.
In my opinion, the extreme paranoia about macro viruses expressed by
the
Help is unwarranted. The expletive deleted lowlifes who delight in
others' misery seem to have discovered that hacking Internet Explorer
is
easier or more satisfying than messing with Office macros. Running
antivirus software that looks for virus signatures is less intrusive

than
summarily disabling all macros. If the idea of the faint possibility of

a
macro virus bothers you, though, feel free to block macros.

There are a few things you can accomplish in Word only by using a macro.
These are rare, and if you find that you need them you can enable them

each
time.
You may run into trouble with third-party software that tries to
integrate
with Office by supplying macros in global templates. By disabling their
macros, you lose that integration. You may see toolbar buttons that don't

do
anything when clicked, etc.
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org

On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 06:05:15 -0700, "JD" wrote:

I'm confused about this issue. I read the following in Word Help:
Security Because macros can contain viruses, be careful about running
them.
Take the following precautions: run up-to-date antivirus software on

your
computer; set your macro security level to high; clear the Trust all
installed add-ins and templates check box; use digital signatures;
maintain
a list of trusted publishers.

It also instructed me how to "remove" a macro publisher from the
Trusted
list.

So I cleared the indicated checkbox and deleted two "trusted

publishers,"
(both Gateway and both "expired"). Then when I opened an old document I
got
a pop-up asking if I wanted to enable or disable a macro that this
document
"contained." It suggested that if I "disabled," I might have trouble

with
the document. So I clicke "enable." The "publisher" in this case was
Microsoft--though the permission installed showed that it "expired" in
November, 2003!

My question is, since I know nothing of macros and have no interest in
using
them, is it safe for me to refuse to accept any?







  #6  
Old April 21st 05, 04:37 AM
Suzanne S. Barnhill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Whenever you save any customization (macros, AutoText, keyboard shortcuts,
toolbars), you are given a choice of where to save it. Normal.dot is the
default, and so most customizations are saved there because users rarely
choose to save them anywhere else. But you can save any of these
customizations in a specific document template or another global template,
and you can save some things in (macros, keyboard shortcuts, and toolbars,
but not AutoText) in documents as well. It just depends on what you have
selected under "Save in" when you create a macro or other customization.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
all may benefit.

"JD" wrote in message
...
How very interesting. I guess the moral of the story is that I should go
ahead and "accept" macros offered from "trusted publishers," most

certainly
from Microsoft.
Upon reflection, I have to admit that I really don't know how a keyboard
shortcut would be "saved in a document." Is this something like "embedding
fonts," which applies only to one document and not to all the others on my
hard drive?
"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
FWIW, I found that a keyboard shortcut saved in a document will be

tagged
as a "macro," and you'll get the warning dialog for it.
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the

newsgroup
so
all may benefit.

"JD" wrote in message
...
Thanks Jay. I'm still wondering why I am offered the choice of

"enabling"
a
macro published by Microsoft in a document that I created a long time

ago
and that has never been off of this computer. I think of macros as bits
of
code written to make Word do things that it doesn't normally do. Is

that
correct? If so, I don't know why I would want or need any macros to run
in
any of my Word documents. I'm not on a network, though I do

occasionally
send them to friends and relatives.
The fact the the document which prompted this post was found to contain

two
macros published by Gateway (my computer brand) makes me wonder why

they
were there. And also, since I "removed" them, have I crippled my

computer
in
some way?
Also, if I may further impose, what is the significance of the
"expiration
date" on these macros? All that I have seen are "expired" in 2003!
And finally, does the acceptance or rejection of macros apply on a per
document basis? That is to say that if I refuse a macro, will that

apply
only to the document currently open or to all of my documents, present
and
future? I guess I'm leery about making a decision that I barely
understand
and that might be irreversible.
Thanks for you help. It is greatly appreciated.
"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
...
Hi JD,
It's always "safe" to refuse to accept any macros. The tradeoff is

that
you will lose any functionality provided by macros that really are

safe
to
run.
In my opinion, the extreme paranoia about macro viruses expressed by
the
Help is unwarranted. The expletive deleted lowlifes who delight in
others' misery seem to have discovered that hacking Internet Explorer
is
easier or more satisfying than messing with Office macros. Running
antivirus software that looks for virus signatures is less intrusive

than
summarily disabling all macros. If the idea of the faint possibility

of
a
macro virus bothers you, though, feel free to block macros.
There are a few things you can accomplish in Word only by using a

macro.
These are rare, and if you find that you need them you can enable them

each
time.
You may run into trouble with third-party software that tries to
integrate
with Office by supplying macros in global templates. By disabling their
macros, you lose that integration. You may see toolbar buttons that

don't
do
anything when clicked, etc.
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org

On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 06:05:15 -0700, "JD" wrote:

I'm confused about this issue. I read the following in Word Help:
Security Because macros can contain viruses, be careful about

running
them.
Take the following precautions: run up-to-date antivirus software on

your
computer; set your macro security level to high; clear the Trust all
installed add-ins and templates check box; use digital signatures;
maintain
a list of trusted publishers.

It also instructed me how to "remove" a macro publisher from the
Trusted
list.

So I cleared the indicated checkbox and deleted two "trusted

publishers,"
(both Gateway and both "expired"). Then when I opened an old document

I
got
a pop-up asking if I wanted to enable or disable a macro that this
document
"contained." It suggested that if I "disabled," I might have trouble

with
the document. So I clicke "enable." The "publisher" in this case was
Microsoft--though the permission installed showed that it "expired"

in
November, 2003!

My question is, since I know nothing of macros and have no interest

in
using
them, is it safe for me to refuse to accept any?








  #7  
Old April 21st 05, 06:19 AM
JD
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Well, I know that I've never created a "macro." I have no idea how to even
do so. I did, however, create a special keystroke combination. Might I
assume, then, that this is the reason that I find a macro in my Word
documents--"published" by Microsoft?
Also, what can you tell me about the "expiration date" on installed macros?
Jim
"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
Whenever you save any customization (macros, AutoText, keyboard shortcuts,
toolbars), you are given a choice of where to save it. Normal.dot is the
default, and so most customizations are saved there because users rarely
choose to save them anywhere else. But you can save any of these
customizations in a specific document template or another global template,
and you can save some things in (macros, keyboard shortcuts, and toolbars,
but not AutoText) in documents as well. It just depends on what you have
selected under "Save in" when you create a macro or other customization.
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
"JD" wrote in message
...
How very interesting. I guess the moral of the story is that I should go
ahead and "accept" macros offered from "trusted publishers," most
certainly from Microsoft.
Upon reflection, I have to admit that I really don't know how a keyboard
shortcut would be "saved in a document." Is this something like
"embedding fonts," which applies only to one document and not to all the
others on my hard drive?
"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
FWIW, I found that a keyboard shortcut saved in a document will be
tagged as a "macro," and you'll get the warning dialog for it.
Suzanne S. Barnhill
"JD" wrote in message
Thanks Jay. I'm still wondering why I am offered the choice of
"enabling" a macro published by Microsoft in a document that I created
a long time ago and that has never been off of this computer. I think
of macros as bits of code written to make Word do things that it
doesn't normally do. Is that correct? If so, I don't know why I would
want or need any macros to run in any of my Word documents. I'm not on
a network, though I do occasionally send them to friends and
relatives.
The fact the the document which prompted this post was found to
contain two macros published by Gateway (my computer brand) makes me
wonder why they were there. And also, since I "removed" them, have I
crippled my computer in some way?
Also, if I may further impose, what is the significance of the
"expiration date" on these macros? All that I have seen are "expired"
in 2003!
And finally, does the acceptance or rejection of macros apply on a per
document basis? That is to say that if I refuse a macro, will that
apply only to the document currently open or to all of my documents,
present and future? I guess I'm leery about making a decision that I
barely understand and that might be irreversible.
Thanks for you help. It is greatly appreciated.
"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
Hi JD,
It's always "safe" to refuse to accept any macros. The tradeoff is
that you will lose any functionality provided by macros that really
are safe to run.
In my opinion, the extreme paranoia about macro viruses expressed by
the Help is unwarranted. The expletive deleted lowlifes who
delight in others' misery seem to have discovered that hacking
Internet Explorer is easier or more satisfying than messing with
Office macros. Running antivirus software that looks for virus
signatures is less intrusive than summarily disabling all macros. If
the idea of the faint possibility of a macro virus bothers you,
though, feel free to block macros.
There are a few things you can accomplish in Word only by using a
macro. These are rare, and if you find that you need them you can
enable them each time. You may run into trouble with third-party
software that tries to integrate with Office by supplying macros in
global templates. By disabling their macros, you lose that
integration. You may see toolbar buttons that don't do anything when
clicked, etc.
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP

On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 06:05:15 -0700, "JD"
wrote:

I'm confused about this issue. I read the following in Word Help:
Security Because macros can contain viruses, be careful about

running
them.
Take the following precautions: run up-to-date antivirus software on
your
computer; set your macro security level to high; clear the Trust all
installed add-ins and templates check box; use digital signatures;
maintain
a list of trusted publishers.

It also instructed me how to "remove" a macro publisher from the
Trusted
list.

So I cleared the indicated checkbox and deleted two "trusted
publishers,"
(both Gateway and both "expired"). Then when I opened an old
document

I
got
a pop-up asking if I wanted to enable or disable a macro that this
document
"contained." It suggested that if I "disabled," I might have trouble
with
the document. So I clicke "enable." The "publisher" in this case was
Microsoft--though the permission installed showed that it "expired"

in
November, 2003!

My question is, since I know nothing of macros and have no interest

in
using
them, is it safe for me to refuse to accept any?



  #8  
Old April 21st 05, 01:00 PM
Suzanne S. Barnhill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Unless you chose to save the keyboard shortcut in the document, it's
unlikely that's the explanation. I'm afraid I know nothing about expiration
dates.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
all may benefit.

"JD" wrote in message
...
Well, I know that I've never created a "macro." I have no idea how to even
do so. I did, however, create a special keystroke combination. Might I
assume, then, that this is the reason that I find a macro in my Word
documents--"published" by Microsoft?
Also, what can you tell me about the "expiration date" on installed

macros?
Jim
"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
...
Whenever you save any customization (macros, AutoText, keyboard

shortcuts,
toolbars), you are given a choice of where to save it. Normal.dot is the
default, and so most customizations are saved there because users rarely
choose to save them anywhere else. But you can save any of these
customizations in a specific document template or another global

template,
and you can save some things in (macros, keyboard shortcuts, and

toolbars,
but not AutoText) in documents as well. It just depends on what you have
selected under "Save in" when you create a macro or other customization.
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
"JD" wrote in message
...
How very interesting. I guess the moral of the story is that I should

go
ahead and "accept" macros offered from "trusted publishers," most
certainly from Microsoft.
Upon reflection, I have to admit that I really don't know how a

keyboard
shortcut would be "saved in a document." Is this something like
"embedding fonts," which applies only to one document and not to all

the
others on my hard drive?
"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote in message
FWIW, I found that a keyboard shortcut saved in a document will be
tagged as a "macro," and you'll get the warning dialog for it.
Suzanne S. Barnhill
"JD" wrote in message
Thanks Jay. I'm still wondering why I am offered the choice of
"enabling" a macro published by Microsoft in a document that I

created
a long time ago and that has never been off of this computer. I

think
of macros as bits of code written to make Word do things that it
doesn't normally do. Is that correct? If so, I don't know why I

would
want or need any macros to run in any of my Word documents. I'm not

on
a network, though I do occasionally send them to friends and
relatives.
The fact the the document which prompted this post was found to
contain two macros published by Gateway (my computer brand) makes me
wonder why they were there. And also, since I "removed" them, have I
crippled my computer in some way?
Also, if I may further impose, what is the significance of the
"expiration date" on these macros? All that I have seen are

"expired"
in 2003!
And finally, does the acceptance or rejection of macros apply on a

per
document basis? That is to say that if I refuse a macro, will that
apply only to the document currently open or to all of my documents,
present and future? I guess I'm leery about making a decision that I
barely understand and that might be irreversible.
Thanks for you help. It is greatly appreciated.
"Jay Freedman" wrote in message
Hi JD,
It's always "safe" to refuse to accept any macros. The tradeoff is
that you will lose any functionality provided by macros that

really
are safe to run.
In my opinion, the extreme paranoia about macro viruses expressed

by
the Help is unwarranted. The expletive deleted lowlifes who
delight in others' misery seem to have discovered that hacking
Internet Explorer is easier or more satisfying than messing with
Office macros. Running antivirus software that looks for virus
signatures is less intrusive than summarily disabling all macros.

If
the idea of the faint possibility of a macro virus bothers you,
though, feel free to block macros.
There are a few things you can accomplish in Word only by using a
macro. These are rare, and if you find that you need them you can
enable them each time. You may run into trouble with third-party
software that tries to integrate with Office by supplying macros in
global templates. By disabling their macros, you lose that
integration. You may see toolbar buttons that don't do anything when
clicked, etc.
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP

On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 06:05:15 -0700, "JD"
wrote:

I'm confused about this issue. I read the following in Word Help:
Security Because macros can contain viruses, be careful about

running
them.
Take the following precautions: run up-to-date antivirus software

on
your
computer; set your macro security level to high; clear the Trust

all
installed add-ins and templates check box; use digital signatures;
maintain
a list of trusted publishers.

It also instructed me how to "remove" a macro publisher from the
Trusted
list.

So I cleared the indicated checkbox and deleted two "trusted
publishers,"
(both Gateway and both "expired"). Then when I opened an old
document

I
got
a pop-up asking if I wanted to enable or disable a macro that this
document
"contained." It suggested that if I "disabled," I might have

trouble
with
the document. So I clicke "enable." The "publisher" in this case

was
Microsoft--though the permission installed showed that it

"expired"
in
November, 2003!

My question is, since I know nothing of macros and have no

interest
in
using
them, is it safe for me to refuse to accept any?




  #9  
Old April 21st 05, 02:41 PM
Cindy M -WordMVP-
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi Suzanne,

FWIW, I found that a keyboard shortcut saved in a document will be tagged as
a "macro," and you'll get the warning dialog for it.

????I don't think so.... Certainly doesn't happen here.

Cindy Meister

  #10  
Old April 21st 05, 06:44 PM
Suzanne S. Barnhill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I have a document that does not contain and has never contained any macros.
It did at one time have a keyboard shortcut assigned to a Wingdings
character, and I would get a macro message on opening. Perhaps my logic was
incorrect, but that was the conclusion I drew.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
all may benefit.

"Cindy M -WordMVP-" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi Suzanne,

FWIW, I found that a keyboard shortcut saved in a document will be

tagged as
a "macro," and you'll get the warning dialog for it.

????I don't think so.... Certainly doesn't happen here.

Cindy Meister


 




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