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enmanuel enmanuel is offline
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Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

answer this right please
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Greg Maxey Greg Maxey is offline
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Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

I would like to see a new born writing with either hand.

--
Greg Maxey/Word MVP
See:
http://gregmaxey.mvps.org/word_tips.htm
For some helpful tips using Word.


enmanuel wrote:
answer this right please



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Terry Farrell[_2_] Terry Farrell[_2_] is offline
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Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

Use Google for a selection of good answers. The simple answer; it's in your
DNA.

Terry Farrell

"enmanuel" wrote in message
...
answer this right please


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Tom Ferguson[_3_] Tom Ferguson[_3_] is offline
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Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

The right answer in the context of this particular newsgroup is, "the
question is off-topic".

Do I get a prize? gdr

Tom
MSMVP 1998-2007

"enmanuel" wrote in message
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answer this right please


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JoAnn Paules JoAnn Paules is offline
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Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

I can't get past wondering how the baby got the pencil/pen/crayon/marker in
there with them before the birth.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]

~~~~~
How to ask a question
http://support.microsoft.com/KB/555375


"Greg Maxey" wrote in message
...
I would like to see a new born writing with either hand.

--
Greg Maxey/Word MVP
See:
http://gregmaxey.mvps.org/word_tips.htm
For some helpful tips using Word.


enmanuel wrote:
answer this right please






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Steve Hayes Steve Hayes is offline
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Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

On Sun, 11 Nov 2007 13:44:01 -0800, enmanuel
wrote:

answer this right please


When using Microsoft Word, you should be typing with both hands.


--
Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/stevesig.htm
Blog: http://methodius.blogspot.com
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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Terry Farrell[_2_] Terry Farrell[_2_] is offline
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Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

That's different. If you hadn't had the accident, you would never have tried
to learn to write with 'the other hand'.

As recently as the middle of the 20th Century, some children were forced to
be right-handed at school. These days that doesn't happen (or at least I
hope not) and the result is that there are an ever increasing percentage of
southpaws.

Terry

"E. Barry Bruyea" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 11 Nov 2007 22:27:49 -0000, "Terry Farrell"
wrote:

Use Google for a selection of good answers. The simple answer; it's in
your
DNA.

Terry Farrell

"enmanuel" wrote in message
...
answer this right please



But it can be modified. I spent the first 21 years of my life right
handed, but due to an accident that caused a long period of
recuperation, I had to learn to write with my left hand and it wasn't
all that hard, but I do most things right handed, like Golf and in
baseball, I bat right handed, but catch left handed. Interestingly
enough, I have never been able to pick up writing with my right hand
again, even though I now have full use of my right arm and hand.


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Tom Ferguson[_3_] Tom Ferguson[_3_] is offline
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Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

In the days of quill pens, and later, fountain pens, there was a good
reason not to write left-handed. English is a left-to-right written
language. Thus, when the pen is held in the left hand to write, there is
a tendency for the hand to move across part of the area where markings
were just made. That tends to smear it.

Tom
MSMVP 1998-2007

"Terry Farrell" wrote in message
...
That's different. If you hadn't had the accident, you would never have
tried to learn to write with 'the other hand'.

As recently as the middle of the 20th Century, some children were
forced to be right-handed at school. These days that doesn't happen (or
at least I hope not) and the result is that there are an ever
increasing percentage of southpaws.

Terry

"E. Barry Bruyea" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 11 Nov 2007 22:27:49 -0000, "Terry Farrell"
wrote:

Use Google for a selection of good answers. The simple answer; it's in
your
DNA.

Terry Farrell

"enmanuel" wrote in message
...
answer this right please



But it can be modified. I spent the first 21 years of my life right
handed, but due to an accident that caused a long period of
recuperation, I had to learn to write with my left hand and it wasn't
all that hard, but I do most things right handed, like Golf and in
baseball, I bat right handed, but catch left handed. Interestingly
enough, I have never been able to pick up writing with my right hand
again, even though I now have full use of my right arm and hand.



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Terry Farrell[_2_] Terry Farrell[_2_] is offline
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Posts: 229
Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

Very true: but not much of a reason for a beating for using a dessert spoon
or fork in the 'wrong' hand.

Terry

"Tom Ferguson" wrote in message
...
In the days of quill pens, and later, fountain pens, there was a good
reason not to write left-handed. English is a left-to-right written
language. Thus, when the pen is held in the left hand to write, there is a
tendency for the hand to move across part of the area where markings were
just made. That tends to smear it.

Tom
MSMVP 1998-2007

"Terry Farrell" wrote in message
...
That's different. If you hadn't had the accident, you would never have
tried to learn to write with 'the other hand'.

As recently as the middle of the 20th Century, some children were forced
to be right-handed at school. These days that doesn't happen (or at least
I hope not) and the result is that there are an ever increasing
percentage of southpaws.

Terry

"E. Barry Bruyea" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 11 Nov 2007 22:27:49 -0000, "Terry Farrell"
wrote:

Use Google for a selection of good answers. The simple answer; it's in
your
DNA.

Terry Farrell

"enmanuel" wrote in message
...
answer this right please


But it can be modified. I spent the first 21 years of my life right
handed, but due to an accident that caused a long period of
recuperation, I had to learn to write with my left hand and it wasn't
all that hard, but I do most things right handed, like Golf and in
baseball, I bat right handed, but catch left handed. Interestingly
enough, I have never been able to pick up writing with my right hand
again, even though I now have full use of my right arm and hand.




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Gordon Gordon is offline
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Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

"Terry Farrell" wrote in message
...
Very true: but not much of a reason for a beating for using a dessert
spoon or fork in the 'wrong' hand.


it's embedded in history - the Latin word for "left" is sinister.......




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Tom Ferguson[_3_] Tom Ferguson[_3_] is offline
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Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

Also true. And also no reason whatsoever for a beating for using the
'wrong' hand for writing.

I have always thought that, when it comes to knife/fork use, most
righties are at a disadvantage compared to many lefties. Many
right-handers will cut meat by putting the knife in their right hand and
the fork in the left. Then they hold the meat to the plate with the fork
and cut with the knife. After cutting, they will then put the knife down
and transfer to fork to the right hand to eat. Of course, that is by no
means uniform. I have seen some who will actually break the meat up with
the side of the fork, given that the toughness of the meat will allow it.
And I know one young lad who actually cuts his meat and then spears the
piece with the knife to eat it. But then, you should see the mess of his
printing. He refuses to write cursively.

Tom


"Terry Farrell" wrote in message
...
Very true: but not much of a reason for a beating for using a dessert
spoon or fork in the 'wrong' hand.

Terry

"Tom Ferguson" wrote in message
...
In the days of quill pens, and later, fountain pens, there was a good
reason not to write left-handed. English is a left-to-right written
language. Thus, when the pen is held in the left hand to write, there
is a tendency for the hand to move across part of the area where
markings were just made. That tends to smear it.

Tom
MSMVP 1998-2007

"Terry Farrell" wrote in message
...
That's different. If you hadn't had the accident, you would never
have tried to learn to write with 'the other hand'.

As recently as the middle of the 20th Century, some children were
forced to be right-handed at school. These days that doesn't happen
(or at least I hope not) and the result is that there are an ever
increasing percentage of southpaws.

Terry

"E. Barry Bruyea" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 11 Nov 2007 22:27:49 -0000, "Terry Farrell"
wrote:

Use Google for a selection of good answers. The simple answer; it's
in your
DNA.

Terry Farrell

"enmanuel" wrote in message
...
answer this right please


But it can be modified. I spent the first 21 years of my life right
handed, but due to an accident that caused a long period of
recuperation, I had to learn to write with my left hand and it
wasn't
all that hard, but I do most things right handed, like Golf and in
baseball, I bat right handed, but catch left handed. Interestingly
enough, I have never been able to pick up writing with my right hand
again, even though I now have full use of my right arm and hand.





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[email protected] romat@invalid.net is offline
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Posts: 25
Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

"Tom Ferguson" wrote:

Also true. And also no reason whatsoever for a beating for using the
'wrong' hand for writing.

I have always thought that, when it comes to knife/fork use, most
righties are at a disadvantage compared to many lefties. Many
right-handers will cut meat by putting the knife in their right hand
and the fork in the left. Then they hold the meat to the plate with
the fork and cut with the knife. After cutting, they will then put the
knife down and transfer to fork to the right hand to eat. Of course,
that is by no means uniform. I have seen some who will actually break
the meat up with the side of the fork, given that the toughness of the
meat will allow it. And I know one young lad who actually cuts his
meat and then spears the piece with the knife to eat it. But then, you
should see the mess of his printing. He refuses to write cursively.

Tom


On the baseball diamond, specifically the batter's box, being lefty
offers one theoretical advantage: being a step or two closer to first
base. When a lefty is right eye dominant and has decent or better
speed, there is a measureable advantage.

RM
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Brian Mailman Brian Mailman is offline
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Posts: 27
Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

Those of us who write with a true inversion (I write just like a
right-handed person, except from the left) learn to pick up our hands at
a slight angle above the paper to avoid that.

B/

Tom Ferguson wrote:
In the days of quill pens, and later, fountain pens, there was a good
reason not to write left-handed. English is a left-to-right written
language. Thus, when the pen is held in the left hand to write, there is
a tendency for the hand to move across part of the area where markings
were just made. That tends to smear it.

Tom
MSMVP 1998-2007

"Terry Farrell" wrote in message
...
That's different. If you hadn't had the accident, you would never have
tried to learn to write with 'the other hand'.

As recently as the middle of the 20th Century, some children were
forced to be right-handed at school. These days that doesn't happen (or
at least I hope not) and the result is that there are an ever
increasing percentage of southpaws.

Terry

"E. Barry Bruyea" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 11 Nov 2007 22:27:49 -0000, "Terry Farrell"
wrote:

Use Google for a selection of good answers. The simple answer; it's in
your
DNA.

Terry Farrell

"enmanuel" wrote in message
...
answer this right please


But it can be modified. I spent the first 21 years of my life right
handed, but due to an accident that caused a long period of
recuperation, I had to learn to write with my left hand and it wasn't
all that hard, but I do most things right handed, like Golf and in
baseball, I bat right handed, but catch left handed. Interestingly
enough, I have never been able to pick up writing with my right hand
again, even though I now have full use of my right arm and hand.



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Tom Ferguson[_3_] Tom Ferguson[_3_] is offline
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Default how are people born writing right or left hand?

I, too, write left-handed. I tend to hold fountain pens further up the
barrel with an angle and finger grip which places the hand below the
written line sufficiently to avoid smearing.

Tom

"Brian Mailman" wrote in message
...
Those of us who write with a true inversion (I write just like a
right-handed person, except from the left) learn to pick up our hands
at a slight angle above the paper to avoid that.

B/

Tom Ferguson wrote:
In the days of quill pens, and later, fountain pens, there was a good
reason not to write left-handed. English is a left-to-right written
language. Thus, when the pen is held in the left hand to write, there
is a tendency for the hand to move across part of the area where
markings were just made. That tends to smear it.

Tom
MSMVP 1998-2007

"Terry Farrell" wrote in message
...
That's different. If you hadn't had the accident, you would never
have tried to learn to write with 'the other hand'.

As recently as the middle of the 20th Century, some children were
forced to be right-handed at school. These days that doesn't happen
(or at least I hope not) and the result is that there are an ever
increasing percentage of southpaws.

Terry

"E. Barry Bruyea" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 11 Nov 2007 22:27:49 -0000, "Terry Farrell"
wrote:

Use Google for a selection of good answers. The simple answer; it's
in your
DNA.

Terry Farrell

"enmanuel" wrote in message
...
answer this right please


But it can be modified. I spent the first 21 years of my life right
handed, but due to an accident that caused a long period of
recuperation, I had to learn to write with my left hand and it
wasn't
all that hard, but I do most things right handed, like Golf and in
baseball, I bat right handed, but catch left handed. Interestingly
enough, I have never been able to pick up writing with my right hand
again, even though I now have full use of my right arm and hand.




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