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Larry
 
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Default Any difference between activating and opening a document?

Is there any practical difference between activating an open document by
clicking on its button on the Window menu, and "opening" the already
open document by clicking on its button on the File menu? Is the latter
method slower and less efficient?

Similarly, to activate an already open document from a macro, is there
any difference between

Documents([DocName]).Activate

and

Documents.Open (DocFullName)

Will the macro work less efficiently if I do the second approach?

Thanks,
Larry


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Jezebel
 
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Default

In principle, activating means switching to an open document, while opening
means read (or re-reading) from disk. In the case of Windows menu vs. File
menu for a document already opened, yes there must be some difference
because selecting an open file from the file menu takes longer.

In respect of VBA, the obvious difference is that opening the document
(whether or not already open) does not activate it.






"Larry" wrote in message
...
Is there any practical difference between activating an open document by
clicking on its button on the Window menu, and "opening" the already
open document by clicking on its button on the File menu? Is the latter
method slower and less efficient?

Similarly, to activate an already open document from a macro, is there
any difference between

Documents([DocName]).Activate

and

Documents.Open (DocFullName)

Will the macro work less efficiently if I do the second approach?

Thanks,
Larry




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Larry
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks.

I've been eyeballing it, running two different macros, one that
activates an open document using the Activate method, and one that
activates the same open document using the Open method, and I don't see
any difference in speed. Therefore, there is nothing lost by using the
Open method in a macro as compared with using the Activate method.

However, though this was not my question, there does seem to be a
difference in speed between using the File menu to activate an open
document, and using the Window menu to open an open document. There's a
slight pause and flash when using the File menu. However, I may be
imagining the difference, and it may be due to the low amount of memory
on the Windows 98 Desktop (64 MB).

Larry



Jezebel wrote:
In principle, activating means switching to an open document, while
opening means read (or re-reading) from disk. In the case of Windows
menu vs. File menu for a document already opened, yes there must be
some difference because selecting an open file from the file menu
takes longer.

In respect of VBA, the obvious difference is that opening the document
(whether or not already open) does not activate it.






"Larry" wrote in message
...
Is there any practical difference between activating an open
document by clicking on its button on the Window menu, and
"opening" the already open document by clicking on its button on
the File menu? Is the latter method slower and less efficient?

Similarly, to activate an already open document from a macro, is
there any difference between

Documents([DocName]).Activate

and

Documents.Open (DocFullName)

Will the macro work less efficiently if I do the second approach?

Thanks,
Larry



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