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TheWheel TheWheel is offline
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Posts: 13
Default How do you use a template?

Nothing I've seen starts at the begining and moves forward!

Simple! How do you use a template?

File Projects My Templates?

THEN WHAT?

Are there ANY fields, or do I just type stuff on?

If I need additional sets of things, what do I do? Just type them in, or
copy and paste the template lines?

How should I replace the template text? Search and replace? Highlight and
Type? Type and delete?

How how how!
  #2   Report Post  
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JoAnn Paules [MVP] JoAnn Paules [MVP] is offline
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Posts: 2,113
Default How do you use a template?

File - New - select a template - do your work

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]




"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
Nothing I've seen starts at the begining and moves forward!

Simple! How do you use a template?

File Projects My Templates?

THEN WHAT?

Are there ANY fields, or do I just type stuff on?

If I need additional sets of things, what do I do? Just type them in, or
copy and paste the template lines?

How should I replace the template text? Search and replace? Highlight and
Type? Type and delete?

How how how!



  #3   Report Post  
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Charles Kenyon Charles Kenyon is offline
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Posts: 276
Default How do you use a template?


--
For more on the different kinds of templates, tabs on the file new dialog,
and locations of templates folders see
http://addbalance.com/usersguide/templates.htm.

However, you may be asking about what Word calls an "online form." Check
this in help. For more about online forms, follow the links at
http://addbalance.com/word/wordwebresources.htm#Forms or
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/Customizat...nTheBlanks.htm especially Dian
Chapman's series of articles. You may also want to look at
http://www.word.mvps.org/FAQs/TblsFl...nesInForms.htm.

You might want to use macrobutton fields instead. See
http://www.addbalance.com/usersguide...tm#MacroButton,
http://www.gmayor.com/Macrobutton.htm and
http://www.mvps.org/word/FAQs/TblsFl...acroButton.htm for more
about macrobutton fields.

Hope this helps,
--

Charles Kenyon

Word New User FAQ & Web Directory: http://addbalance.com/word

Intermediate User's Guide to Microsoft Word (supplemented version of
Microsoft's Legal Users' Guide) http://addbalance.com/usersguide

See also the MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/ which is awesome!

My criminal defense site: http://addbalance.com
--------- --------- --------- --------- --------- ---------
This message is posted to a newsgroup. Please post replies
and questions to the newsgroup so that others can learn
from my ignorance and your wisdom.
"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
Nothing I've seen starts at the begining and moves forward!

Simple! How do you use a template?

File Projects My Templates?

THEN WHAT?

Are there ANY fields, or do I just type stuff on?

If I need additional sets of things, what do I do? Just type them in, or
copy and paste the template lines?

How should I replace the template text? Search and replace? Highlight and
Type? Type and delete?

How how how!



  #5   Report Post  
Posted to microsoft.public.word.docmanagement
Shauna Kelly Shauna Kelly is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 571
Default How do you use a template?

Hi Wheel

To add to what JoAnn and Charles said, it's worth bearing in mind that
people create templates for different reasons. When you create a new
document from a template, you'll see quite different things depending on
what the template creator had in mind. Here are some examples:

1. A template might be created to help people use appropriate formatting.
When you create a new document from the template, the body of the document
might be completely empty. You can just type the text you choose. Businesses
create templates like this to help you use the standard formatting the
business has chosen. So when you apply, say, the Heading 1 style, Heading 1
might be defined as blue Arial 16pt. In a different template, Heading 1
might be green Times New Roman 18pt.

Some templates like this have additional toolbars to help you insert
standard pieces of text, or to apply styles (like Heading 1) easily, or to
provide extra functionality to Word.


2. A template might be set up to help you lay out a complex document. A
template for a newsletter or flyer might be like this. It may be laid out in
columns, it might have a banner on the front with place for a logo.


3. A template might be set up as a form, for example an Application for
Leave form. So the template will include text (like "Name") and a place for
you to type your name. Some form-type templates are simple forms where you
type where indicated. Some might be partly protected so the template will
only allow you to type in the right places. Some can be quite sophisticated.
For example, when you type your name, the template might look up your name
in a database, find your supervisor's name and automatically add the
supervisor's name to the document.


4. Other templates are designed to give you standard text as a starting
point for your document. In a business, you might have a standard contract
for buying goods and services. The template would hold all the required text
of the contract, perhaps dozens of pages of text. It may have places for you
to type the name of the supplier, the price and so on. Templates like this
may or may not care much about formatting or layout.


5. Some templates use a wizard. When you create a new document from this
kind of template, a wizard opens that asks you for information, and then
puts the information into the new document. There are some built-in wizards
in Word. Try File New. In the Task pane at the right, click On My
Computer. Now, on the Other Documents tab, click the Calendar Wizard, and
then click OK.


There are several templates built in to Word (which you can access through
File New and "On my computer"). You can download templates from Microsoft
at http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/te...323741033.aspx. And, of
course, you can create your own templates.

Hope this helps.

Shauna Kelly. Microsoft MVP.
http://www.shaunakelly.com/word


"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
Nothing I've seen starts at the begining and moves forward!

Simple! How do you use a template?

File Projects My Templates?

THEN WHAT?

Are there ANY fields, or do I just type stuff on?

If I need additional sets of things, what do I do? Just type them in, or
copy and paste the template lines?

How should I replace the template text? Search and replace? Highlight and
Type? Type and delete?

How how how!





  #6   Report Post  
Posted to microsoft.public.word.docmanagement
TheWheel TheWheel is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default How do you use a template?

Thank you to all in the chain.

However, I must assume I have been unclear.

I wish to use a pre-existing, Microsoft provided template, obtained through
the "live" link to templates from inside Word 2003.

By "use" I mean to understand the significance of areas that are "gray" and
appear to be fields for input of my information.

I asked several very specific and very mechanical questions concerning
whether these "gray" spots are intended only to be "overstriken" and
obliterated, or whether there may be some slightly more sufisticated manner
available to obtain "replacements" of those values.

For all the effort Microsoft help demonstrates, and the efforts of the good
people above in this thread, I do not see anything addressing these very
straightforward mechanical questions.

I am starting to suspect that Instead of using all caps for CLIENT NAME and
just typing over it, some people use macrobuttons, not to run macros at all,
but simply to be obliterated by typing over them. Seems like a gross waste of
horsepower. Of course, this really doesn't address the order of operations
required to change a document rather than the template when doing so.

If I were addressing Microsoft (do "they" listen?) I would suggest that
every help topic be reviewed with respect to: Why does one want to do this?
What other alternatives are there? From the beginning, what is done? And
avoid generalities in the instructions portion of the help. Exemplify by
picking an instance and making an example of it.

Thanks for all your efforts, and any future comments you may wish to make.
-- David

"Shauna Kelly" wrote:

Hi Wheel

To add to what JoAnn and Charles said, it's worth bearing in mind that
people create templates for different reasons. When you create a new
document from a template, you'll see quite different things depending on
what the template creator had in mind. Here are some examples:

1. A template might be created to help people use appropriate formatting.
When you create a new document from the template, the body of the document
might be completely empty. You can just type the text you choose. Businesses
create templates like this to help you use the standard formatting the
business has chosen. So when you apply, say, the Heading 1 style, Heading 1
might be defined as blue Arial 16pt. In a different template, Heading 1
might be green Times New Roman 18pt.

Some templates like this have additional toolbars to help you insert
standard pieces of text, or to apply styles (like Heading 1) easily, or to
provide extra functionality to Word.


2. A template might be set up to help you lay out a complex document. A
template for a newsletter or flyer might be like this. It may be laid out in
columns, it might have a banner on the front with place for a logo.


3. A template might be set up as a form, for example an Application for
Leave form. So the template will include text (like "Name") and a place for
you to type your name. Some form-type templates are simple forms where you
type where indicated. Some might be partly protected so the template will
only allow you to type in the right places. Some can be quite sophisticated.
For example, when you type your name, the template might look up your name
in a database, find your supervisor's name and automatically add the
supervisor's name to the document.


4. Other templates are designed to give you standard text as a starting
point for your document. In a business, you might have a standard contract
for buying goods and services. The template would hold all the required text
of the contract, perhaps dozens of pages of text. It may have places for you
to type the name of the supplier, the price and so on. Templates like this
may or may not care much about formatting or layout.


5. Some templates use a wizard. When you create a new document from this
kind of template, a wizard opens that asks you for information, and then
puts the information into the new document. There are some built-in wizards
in Word. Try File New. In the Task pane at the right, click On My
Computer. Now, on the Other Documents tab, click the Calendar Wizard, and
then click OK.


There are several templates built in to Word (which you can access through
File New and "On my computer"). You can download templates from Microsoft
at http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/te...323741033.aspx. And, of
course, you can create your own templates.

Hope this helps.

Shauna Kelly. Microsoft MVP.
http://www.shaunakelly.com/word


"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
Nothing I've seen starts at the begining and moves forward!

Simple! How do you use a template?

File Projects My Templates?

THEN WHAT?

Are there ANY fields, or do I just type stuff on?

If I need additional sets of things, what do I do? Just type them in, or
copy and paste the template lines?

How should I replace the template text? Search and replace? Highlight and
Type? Type and delete?

How how how!




  #7   Report Post  
Posted to microsoft.public.word.docmanagement
TheWheel TheWheel is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default How do you use a template?

To provide you with an example of what is not helpful... take the following
linked document/instructions:

http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=22

I would copy and paste verbatim, but I think it may be protected... (against
what I ask)

Open a blank template in Word by clicking File|New and be sure to choose the
TEMPLATE option before you click OK.

Aside from the fact that there is no TEMPLATE option in Word 2003

Do you understand at all? Not one entire instruction into the process, and
it does not work. It isn't even possible as written.

I'm getting an irritating right hand panel with many icons and links, even
headers and a search field, and nothing remotely resembling the ability to
"choose TEMPLATES" and certainly no OK Button.

So, for clarity, again, I would suggest to MICROSOFT that they make sure
available instructions actually are POSSIBLE to follow.

Hmmm. Is that really such a revolutionary idea?

David

"TheWheel" wrote:

Thank you to all in the chain.

However, I must assume I have been unclear.

I wish to use a pre-existing, Microsoft provided template, obtained through
the "live" link to templates from inside Word 2003.

By "use" I mean to understand the significance of areas that are "gray" and
appear to be fields for input of my information.

I asked several very specific and very mechanical questions concerning
whether these "gray" spots are intended only to be "overstriken" and
obliterated, or whether there may be some slightly more sufisticated manner
available to obtain "replacements" of those values.

For all the effort Microsoft help demonstrates, and the efforts of the good
people above in this thread, I do not see anything addressing these very
straightforward mechanical questions.

I am starting to suspect that Instead of using all caps for CLIENT NAME and
just typing over it, some people use macrobuttons, not to run macros at all,
but simply to be obliterated by typing over them. Seems like a gross waste of
horsepower. Of course, this really doesn't address the order of operations
required to change a document rather than the template when doing so.

If I were addressing Microsoft (do "they" listen?) I would suggest that
every help topic be reviewed with respect to: Why does one want to do this?
What other alternatives are there? From the beginning, what is done? And
avoid generalities in the instructions portion of the help. Exemplify by
picking an instance and making an example of it.

Thanks for all your efforts, and any future comments you may wish to make.
-- David

"Shauna Kelly" wrote:

Hi Wheel

To add to what JoAnn and Charles said, it's worth bearing in mind that
people create templates for different reasons. When you create a new
document from a template, you'll see quite different things depending on
what the template creator had in mind. Here are some examples:

1. A template might be created to help people use appropriate formatting.
When you create a new document from the template, the body of the document
might be completely empty. You can just type the text you choose. Businesses
create templates like this to help you use the standard formatting the
business has chosen. So when you apply, say, the Heading 1 style, Heading 1
might be defined as blue Arial 16pt. In a different template, Heading 1
might be green Times New Roman 18pt.

Some templates like this have additional toolbars to help you insert
standard pieces of text, or to apply styles (like Heading 1) easily, or to
provide extra functionality to Word.


2. A template might be set up to help you lay out a complex document. A
template for a newsletter or flyer might be like this. It may be laid out in
columns, it might have a banner on the front with place for a logo.


3. A template might be set up as a form, for example an Application for
Leave form. So the template will include text (like "Name") and a place for
you to type your name. Some form-type templates are simple forms where you
type where indicated. Some might be partly protected so the template will
only allow you to type in the right places. Some can be quite sophisticated.
For example, when you type your name, the template might look up your name
in a database, find your supervisor's name and automatically add the
supervisor's name to the document.


4. Other templates are designed to give you standard text as a starting
point for your document. In a business, you might have a standard contract
for buying goods and services. The template would hold all the required text
of the contract, perhaps dozens of pages of text. It may have places for you
to type the name of the supplier, the price and so on. Templates like this
may or may not care much about formatting or layout.


5. Some templates use a wizard. When you create a new document from this
kind of template, a wizard opens that asks you for information, and then
puts the information into the new document. There are some built-in wizards
in Word. Try File New. In the Task pane at the right, click On My
Computer. Now, on the Other Documents tab, click the Calendar Wizard, and
then click OK.


There are several templates built in to Word (which you can access through
File New and "On my computer"). You can download templates from Microsoft
at http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/te...323741033.aspx. And, of
course, you can create your own templates.

Hope this helps.

Shauna Kelly. Microsoft MVP.
http://www.shaunakelly.com/word


"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
Nothing I've seen starts at the begining and moves forward!

Simple! How do you use a template?

File Projects My Templates?

THEN WHAT?

Are there ANY fields, or do I just type stuff on?

If I need additional sets of things, what do I do? Just type them in, or
copy and paste the template lines?

How should I replace the template text? Search and replace? Highlight and
Type? Type and delete?

How how how!




  #8   Report Post  
Posted to microsoft.public.word.docmanagement
Suzanne S. Barnhill Suzanne S. Barnhill is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 33,624
Default How do you use a template?

Yes, it is very difficult to get to the File New dialog in Word 2002/2003.
To do so, you must use File | New... and then select "On my computer" in
the New Document task pane. The article to which you refer was probably
written for Word 2000 or earlier, where File | New... took you straight to
the dialog (see http://sbarnhill.mvps.org/WordFAQs/C...ngWord2002.htm
for instructions on regaining this functionality). In that dialog you can
create a new template.

But that is not what you're asking. If you will tell us exactly which
template you're using (give the URL from which you downloaded it), we can
tell you how it's supposed to be used. These templates are mostly provided
by third parties (not Microsoft) and use a variety of different formatting
options. Many templates use MacroButton NoMacro fields; these usually have
text such as [Type name here], and when you click on them, they are selected
and you overtype them. Other fields may be intended to be filled by a
UserForm (wizard) that runs when you create a new document based on the
template. But we don't have any way of knowing which of these techniques (or
some other) has been used unless we know which template you're talking
about.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
all may benefit.

"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
To provide you with an example of what is not helpful... take the

following
linked document/instructions:

http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=22

I would copy and paste verbatim, but I think it may be protected...

(against
what I ask)

Open a blank template in Word by clicking File|New and be sure to choose

the
TEMPLATE option before you click OK.

Aside from the fact that there is no TEMPLATE option in Word 2003

Do you understand at all? Not one entire instruction into the process, and
it does not work. It isn't even possible as written.

I'm getting an irritating right hand panel with many icons and links, even
headers and a search field, and nothing remotely resembling the ability to
"choose TEMPLATES" and certainly no OK Button.

So, for clarity, again, I would suggest to MICROSOFT that they make sure
available instructions actually are POSSIBLE to follow.

Hmmm. Is that really such a revolutionary idea?

David

"TheWheel" wrote:

Thank you to all in the chain.

However, I must assume I have been unclear.

I wish to use a pre-existing, Microsoft provided template, obtained

through
the "live" link to templates from inside Word 2003.

By "use" I mean to understand the significance of areas that are "gray"

and
appear to be fields for input of my information.

I asked several very specific and very mechanical questions concerning
whether these "gray" spots are intended only to be "overstriken" and
obliterated, or whether there may be some slightly more sufisticated

manner
available to obtain "replacements" of those values.

For all the effort Microsoft help demonstrates, and the efforts of the

good
people above in this thread, I do not see anything addressing these very
straightforward mechanical questions.

I am starting to suspect that Instead of using all caps for CLIENT NAME

and
just typing over it, some people use macrobuttons, not to run macros at

all,
but simply to be obliterated by typing over them. Seems like a gross

waste of
horsepower. Of course, this really doesn't address the order of

operations
required to change a document rather than the template when doing so.

If I were addressing Microsoft (do "they" listen?) I would suggest that
every help topic be reviewed with respect to: Why does one want to do

this?
What other alternatives are there? From the beginning, what is done? And
avoid generalities in the instructions portion of the help. Exemplify by
picking an instance and making an example of it.

Thanks for all your efforts, and any future comments you may wish to

make.
-- David

"Shauna Kelly" wrote:

Hi Wheel

To add to what JoAnn and Charles said, it's worth bearing in mind that
people create templates for different reasons. When you create a new
document from a template, you'll see quite different things depending

on
what the template creator had in mind. Here are some examples:

1. A template might be created to help people use appropriate

formatting.
When you create a new document from the template, the body of the

document
might be completely empty. You can just type the text you choose.

Businesses
create templates like this to help you use the standard formatting the
business has chosen. So when you apply, say, the Heading 1 style,

Heading 1
might be defined as blue Arial 16pt. In a different template, Heading

1
might be green Times New Roman 18pt.

Some templates like this have additional toolbars to help you insert
standard pieces of text, or to apply styles (like Heading 1) easily,

or to
provide extra functionality to Word.


2. A template might be set up to help you lay out a complex document.

A
template for a newsletter or flyer might be like this. It may be laid

out in
columns, it might have a banner on the front with place for a logo.


3. A template might be set up as a form, for example an Application

for
Leave form. So the template will include text (like "Name") and a

place for
you to type your name. Some form-type templates are simple forms where

you
type where indicated. Some might be partly protected so the template

will
only allow you to type in the right places. Some can be quite

sophisticated.
For example, when you type your name, the template might look up your

name
in a database, find your supervisor's name and automatically add the
supervisor's name to the document.


4. Other templates are designed to give you standard text as a

starting
point for your document. In a business, you might have a standard

contract
for buying goods and services. The template would hold all the

required text
of the contract, perhaps dozens of pages of text. It may have places

for you
to type the name of the supplier, the price and so on. Templates like

this
may or may not care much about formatting or layout.


5. Some templates use a wizard. When you create a new document from

this
kind of template, a wizard opens that asks you for information, and

then
puts the information into the new document. There are some built-in

wizards
in Word. Try File New. In the Task pane at the right, click On My
Computer. Now, on the Other Documents tab, click the Calendar Wizard,

and
then click OK.


There are several templates built in to Word (which you can access

through
File New and "On my computer"). You can download templates from

Microsoft
at http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/te...323741033.aspx.

And, of
course, you can create your own templates.

Hope this helps.

Shauna Kelly. Microsoft MVP.
http://www.shaunakelly.com/word


"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
Nothing I've seen starts at the begining and moves forward!

Simple! How do you use a template?

File Projects My Templates?

THEN WHAT?

Are there ANY fields, or do I just type stuff on?

If I need additional sets of things, what do I do? Just type them

in, or
copy and paste the template lines?

How should I replace the template text? Search and replace?

Highlight and
Type? Type and delete?

How how how!




  #9   Report Post  
Posted to microsoft.public.word.docmanagement
TheWheel TheWheel is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default How do you use a template?

Suzanne, Indeed. The reason Eskimos are reputted to have seven different
names for "snow" is that there are seven significantly different
relationships to snow, for the eskimo.

I'm beginning to believe that "templates" covers an almost equal number of
significant differences with only one indistinct term: templates.

I used to create a boiler plate of text and save it in a file I would re-use
to cut down typing required... I called that a template at one time. The fill
in data was just missing. Nothing fancy. Later Satelite Software Inc produced
a word processor that would mail merge a list with a letter. The letter was
considered to be a template. The merge points were "fields." That seemed more
deserving of the term template.

MS Word seems to cover both of these and several other very distinct
techniques under an almost uselessly general term: templates. Thus, as you
point out, without specific instructions or technical inspection of a
template, being that it migh be any one of several very different things, it
is impossible to characterize a "template" operationally, or to provide "How
to use" instructions, because it is litterally impossible to know what is
being talked about.

I was interested in using the online Business letter templates, provided
through the Microsoft online mechanism.

Thank you for your patience and clarity. Being as their are "7" different
things a template can be, there are at least "7" very different sets of
instuctions relative to operating them. Getting an answer would require
knowing both which technology had been used, and how it had been implemented,
and the creators intention relative to use.

thanks. David

"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote:

Yes, it is very difficult to get to the File New dialog in Word 2002/2003.
To do so, you must use File | New... and then select "On my computer" in
the New Document task pane. The article to which you refer was probably
written for Word 2000 or earlier, where File | New... took you straight to
the dialog (see http://sbarnhill.mvps.org/WordFAQs/C...ngWord2002.htm
for instructions on regaining this functionality). In that dialog you can
create a new template.

But that is not what you're asking. If you will tell us exactly which
template you're using (give the URL from which you downloaded it), we can
tell you how it's supposed to be used. These templates are mostly provided
by third parties (not Microsoft) and use a variety of different formatting
options. Many templates use MacroButton NoMacro fields; these usually have
text such as [Type name here], and when you click on them, they are selected
and you overtype them. Other fields may be intended to be filled by a
UserForm (wizard) that runs when you create a new document based on the
template. But we don't have any way of knowing which of these techniques (or
some other) has been used unless we know which template you're talking
about.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
all may benefit.

"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
To provide you with an example of what is not helpful... take the

following
linked document/instructions:

http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=22

I would copy and paste verbatim, but I think it may be protected...

(against
what I ask)

Open a blank template in Word by clicking File|New and be sure to choose

the
TEMPLATE option before you click OK.

Aside from the fact that there is no TEMPLATE option in Word 2003

Do you understand at all? Not one entire instruction into the process, and
it does not work. It isn't even possible as written.

I'm getting an irritating right hand panel with many icons and links, even
headers and a search field, and nothing remotely resembling the ability to
"choose TEMPLATES" and certainly no OK Button.

So, for clarity, again, I would suggest to MICROSOFT that they make sure
available instructions actually are POSSIBLE to follow.

Hmmm. Is that really such a revolutionary idea?

David

"TheWheel" wrote:

Thank you to all in the chain.

However, I must assume I have been unclear.

I wish to use a pre-existing, Microsoft provided template, obtained

through
the "live" link to templates from inside Word 2003.

By "use" I mean to understand the significance of areas that are "gray"

and
appear to be fields for input of my information.

I asked several very specific and very mechanical questions concerning
whether these "gray" spots are intended only to be "overstriken" and
obliterated, or whether there may be some slightly more sufisticated

manner
available to obtain "replacements" of those values.

For all the effort Microsoft help demonstrates, and the efforts of the

good
people above in this thread, I do not see anything addressing these very
straightforward mechanical questions.

I am starting to suspect that Instead of using all caps for CLIENT NAME

and
just typing over it, some people use macrobuttons, not to run macros at

all,
but simply to be obliterated by typing over them. Seems like a gross

waste of
horsepower. Of course, this really doesn't address the order of

operations
required to change a document rather than the template when doing so.

If I were addressing Microsoft (do "they" listen?) I would suggest that
every help topic be reviewed with respect to: Why does one want to do

this?
What other alternatives are there? From the beginning, what is done? And
avoid generalities in the instructions portion of the help. Exemplify by
picking an instance and making an example of it.

Thanks for all your efforts, and any future comments you may wish to

make.
-- David

"Shauna Kelly" wrote:

Hi Wheel

To add to what JoAnn and Charles said, it's worth bearing in mind that
people create templates for different reasons. When you create a new
document from a template, you'll see quite different things depending

on
what the template creator had in mind. Here are some examples:

1. A template might be created to help people use appropriate

formatting.
When you create a new document from the template, the body of the

document
might be completely empty. You can just type the text you choose.

Businesses
create templates like this to help you use the standard formatting the
business has chosen. So when you apply, say, the Heading 1 style,

Heading 1
might be defined as blue Arial 16pt. In a different template, Heading

1
might be green Times New Roman 18pt.

Some templates like this have additional toolbars to help you insert
standard pieces of text, or to apply styles (like Heading 1) easily,

or to
provide extra functionality to Word.


2. A template might be set up to help you lay out a complex document.

A
template for a newsletter or flyer might be like this. It may be laid

out in
columns, it might have a banner on the front with place for a logo.


3. A template might be set up as a form, for example an Application

for
Leave form. So the template will include text (like "Name") and a

place for
you to type your name. Some form-type templates are simple forms where

you
type where indicated. Some might be partly protected so the template

will
only allow you to type in the right places. Some can be quite

sophisticated.
For example, when you type your name, the template might look up your

name
in a database, find your supervisor's name and automatically add the
supervisor's name to the document.


4. Other templates are designed to give you standard text as a

starting
point for your document. In a business, you might have a standard

contract
for buying goods and services. The template would hold all the

required text
of the contract, perhaps dozens of pages of text. It may have places

for you
to type the name of the supplier, the price and so on. Templates like

this
may or may not care much about formatting or layout.


5. Some templates use a wizard. When you create a new document from

this
kind of template, a wizard opens that asks you for information, and

then
puts the information into the new document. There are some built-in

wizards
in Word. Try File New. In the Task pane at the right, click On My
Computer. Now, on the Other Documents tab, click the Calendar Wizard,

and
then click OK.


There are several templates built in to Word (which you can access

through
File New and "On my computer"). You can download templates from

Microsoft
at http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/te...323741033.aspx.

And, of
course, you can create your own templates.

Hope this helps.

Shauna Kelly. Microsoft MVP.
http://www.shaunakelly.com/word


"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
Nothing I've seen starts at the begining and moves forward!

Simple! How do you use a template?

File Projects My Templates?

THEN WHAT?

Are there ANY fields, or do I just type stuff on?

If I need additional sets of things, what do I do? Just type them

in, or
copy and paste the template lines?

How should I replace the template text? Search and replace?

Highlight and
Type? Type and delete?

How how how!





  #10   Report Post  
Posted to microsoft.public.word.docmanagement
Shauna Kelly Shauna Kelly is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 571
Default How do you use a template?

Hi

I'm beginning to believe that "templates" covers an almost equal number of

significant differences with only one indistinct term: templates.

"Template" in Microsoft Word lingo is a technical term with a specific
meaning: A template is a computer file with a certain internal structure,
and the file is normally indicated with the default file extension of .dot.
Word uses a file of this kind as the basis from which to create a new
document. Or, to put it in other terms, when Word creates a new document, it
bases the document on the template you choose (and if you don't choose one,
Word bases your new document on the normal.dot template).

There's a description of the relationship between templates and documents
he
What is the relationship between a Word document and its template?
http://www.ShaunaKelly.com/word/temp...ons/index.html

Creators of templates have a wide variety of tools at their disposal and can
build all kinds of sophisticated functionality, formatting and content into
their templates. If they do that well, the template will be easy to use. If
you are facing a template and wondering what to do with it then, in my view,
it's a poor template.

Having said all of that, I am conscious that the word "template" is, sadly,
used loosely for all kinds of things beyond its specific technical meaning
in Word. Outside Word, of course, "template" can mean any number of things
depending on the context.

Hope this helps.

Shauna Kelly. Microsoft MVP.
http://www.shaunakelly.com/word


"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
Suzanne, Indeed. The reason Eskimos are reputted to have seven different
names for "snow" is that there are seven significantly different
relationships to snow, for the eskimo.

I'm beginning to believe that "templates" covers an almost equal number of
significant differences with only one indistinct term: templates.

I used to create a boiler plate of text and save it in a file I would
re-use
to cut down typing required... I called that a template at one time. The
fill
in data was just missing. Nothing fancy. Later Satelite Software Inc
produced
a word processor that would mail merge a list with a letter. The letter
was
considered to be a template. The merge points were "fields." That seemed
more
deserving of the term template.

MS Word seems to cover both of these and several other very distinct
techniques under an almost uselessly general term: templates. Thus, as you
point out, without specific instructions or technical inspection of a
template, being that it migh be any one of several very different things,
it
is impossible to characterize a "template" operationally, or to provide
"How
to use" instructions, because it is litterally impossible to know what is
being talked about.

I was interested in using the online Business letter templates, provided
through the Microsoft online mechanism.

Thank you for your patience and clarity. Being as their are "7" different
things a template can be, there are at least "7" very different sets of
instuctions relative to operating them. Getting an answer would require
knowing both which technology had been used, and how it had been
implemented,
and the creators intention relative to use.

thanks. David

"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote:

Yes, it is very difficult to get to the File New dialog in Word
2002/2003.
To do so, you must use File | New... and then select "On my computer" in
the New Document task pane. The article to which you refer was probably
written for Word 2000 or earlier, where File | New... took you straight
to
the dialog (see
http://sbarnhill.mvps.org/WordFAQs/C...ngWord2002.htm
for instructions on regaining this functionality). In that dialog you can
create a new template.

But that is not what you're asking. If you will tell us exactly which
template you're using (give the URL from which you downloaded it), we can
tell you how it's supposed to be used. These templates are mostly
provided
by third parties (not Microsoft) and use a variety of different
formatting
options. Many templates use MacroButton NoMacro fields; these usually
have
text such as [Type name here], and when you click on them, they are
selected
and you overtype them. Other fields may be intended to be filled by a
UserForm (wizard) that runs when you create a new document based on the
template. But we don't have any way of knowing which of these techniques
(or
some other) has been used unless we know which template you're talking
about.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup
so
all may benefit.

"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
To provide you with an example of what is not helpful... take the

following
linked document/instructions:

http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=22

I would copy and paste verbatim, but I think it may be protected...

(against
what I ask)

Open a blank template in Word by clicking File|New and be sure to
choose

the
TEMPLATE option before you click OK.

Aside from the fact that there is no TEMPLATE option in Word 2003

Do you understand at all? Not one entire instruction into the process,
and
it does not work. It isn't even possible as written.

I'm getting an irritating right hand panel with many icons and links,
even
headers and a search field, and nothing remotely resembling the ability
to
"choose TEMPLATES" and certainly no OK Button.

So, for clarity, again, I would suggest to MICROSOFT that they make
sure
available instructions actually are POSSIBLE to follow.

Hmmm. Is that really such a revolutionary idea?

David

"TheWheel" wrote:

Thank you to all in the chain.

However, I must assume I have been unclear.

I wish to use a pre-existing, Microsoft provided template, obtained

through
the "live" link to templates from inside Word 2003.

By "use" I mean to understand the significance of areas that are
"gray"

and
appear to be fields for input of my information.

I asked several very specific and very mechanical questions
concerning
whether these "gray" spots are intended only to be "overstriken" and
obliterated, or whether there may be some slightly more sufisticated

manner
available to obtain "replacements" of those values.

For all the effort Microsoft help demonstrates, and the efforts of
the

good
people above in this thread, I do not see anything addressing these
very
straightforward mechanical questions.

I am starting to suspect that Instead of using all caps for CLIENT
NAME

and
just typing over it, some people use macrobuttons, not to run macros
at

all,
but simply to be obliterated by typing over them. Seems like a gross

waste of
horsepower. Of course, this really doesn't address the order of

operations
required to change a document rather than the template when doing so.

If I were addressing Microsoft (do "they" listen?) I would suggest
that
every help topic be reviewed with respect to: Why does one want to do

this?
What other alternatives are there? From the beginning, what is done?
And
avoid generalities in the instructions portion of the help. Exemplify
by
picking an instance and making an example of it.

Thanks for all your efforts, and any future comments you may wish to

make.
-- David

"Shauna Kelly" wrote:

Hi Wheel

To add to what JoAnn and Charles said, it's worth bearing in mind
that
people create templates for different reasons. When you create a
new
document from a template, you'll see quite different things
depending

on
what the template creator had in mind. Here are some examples:

1. A template might be created to help people use appropriate

formatting.
When you create a new document from the template, the body of the

document
might be completely empty. You can just type the text you choose.

Businesses
create templates like this to help you use the standard formatting
the
business has chosen. So when you apply, say, the Heading 1 style,

Heading 1
might be defined as blue Arial 16pt. In a different template,
Heading

1
might be green Times New Roman 18pt.

Some templates like this have additional toolbars to help you
insert
standard pieces of text, or to apply styles (like Heading 1)
easily,

or to
provide extra functionality to Word.


2. A template might be set up to help you lay out a complex
document.

A
template for a newsletter or flyer might be like this. It may be
laid

out in
columns, it might have a banner on the front with place for a logo.


3. A template might be set up as a form, for example an Application

for
Leave form. So the template will include text (like "Name") and a

place for
you to type your name. Some form-type templates are simple forms
where

you
type where indicated. Some might be partly protected so the
template

will
only allow you to type in the right places. Some can be quite

sophisticated.
For example, when you type your name, the template might look up
your

name
in a database, find your supervisor's name and automatically add
the
supervisor's name to the document.


4. Other templates are designed to give you standard text as a

starting
point for your document. In a business, you might have a standard

contract
for buying goods and services. The template would hold all the

required text
of the contract, perhaps dozens of pages of text. It may have
places

for you
to type the name of the supplier, the price and so on. Templates
like

this
may or may not care much about formatting or layout.


5. Some templates use a wizard. When you create a new document from

this
kind of template, a wizard opens that asks you for information, and

then
puts the information into the new document. There are some built-in

wizards
in Word. Try File New. In the Task pane at the right, click On My
Computer. Now, on the Other Documents tab, click the Calendar
Wizard,

and
then click OK.


There are several templates built in to Word (which you can access

through
File New and "On my computer"). You can download templates from

Microsoft
at http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/te...323741033.aspx.

And, of
course, you can create your own templates.

Hope this helps.

Shauna Kelly. Microsoft MVP.
http://www.shaunakelly.com/word


"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
Nothing I've seen starts at the begining and moves forward!

Simple! How do you use a template?

File Projects My Templates?

THEN WHAT?

Are there ANY fields, or do I just type stuff on?

If I need additional sets of things, what do I do? Just type them

in, or
copy and paste the template lines?

How should I replace the template text? Search and replace?

Highlight and
Type? Type and delete?

How how how!









  #11   Report Post  
Posted to microsoft.public.word.docmanagement
Suzanne S. Barnhill Suzanne S. Barnhill is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 33,624
Default How do you use a template?

Shauna has addressed most of the points I was going to make, but herewith a
few more comments:

1. Although the word "template" has many meanings in the world in general,
in Word it means one thing: a .dot file. You could regard a mail merge main
document as a sort of template, and many users reuse documents as templates,
but neither is a .dot file, so it isn't a *Word* template.

2. Templates can be constructed and used in many ways:

* Some of the Word templates at Office Online depend heavily on text boxes
and graphic elements (the sort of layout really more suitable for
Publisher), and these can be very confusing if you want to customize them
very much.

* Many of the templates that ship with Word include "wizards" (basically
just UserForms) that allow you to enter text to be inserted at specific
points in the resulting document or added to a modified template.

* Many of these built-in templates use MacroButton fields for entering text
or checking boxes. Most users find these easy to use but puzzling to
duplicate.

* Some templates (such as invoices) use form fields and formula fields. Some
are a blank slate that provides only a set of styles; others provide a lot
of built-in formatting (fancy headers/footers, watermarks, etc.).

All this depends on what they are intended to do. If what you are trying to
do with a template doesn't match what it is intended to do, then you are
going to be frustrated.

I submit, however, that it is always helpful to get as much information as
you can about the "shape" and construction of a document by displaying
nonprinting characters, text boundaries, table gridlines, and all the other
available clues (see http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/RevealCodes.htm).
Something as simple as being able to see that a résumé is set up as a table
would help a lot of users.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
all may benefit.

"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
Suzanne, Indeed. The reason Eskimos are reputted to have seven different
names for "snow" is that there are seven significantly different
relationships to snow, for the eskimo.

I'm beginning to believe that "templates" covers an almost equal number of
significant differences with only one indistinct term: templates.

I used to create a boiler plate of text and save it in a file I would

re-use
to cut down typing required... I called that a template at one time. The

fill
in data was just missing. Nothing fancy. Later Satelite Software Inc

produced
a word processor that would mail merge a list with a letter. The letter

was
considered to be a template. The merge points were "fields." That seemed

more
deserving of the term template.

MS Word seems to cover both of these and several other very distinct
techniques under an almost uselessly general term: templates. Thus, as you
point out, without specific instructions or technical inspection of a
template, being that it migh be any one of several very different things,

it
is impossible to characterize a "template" operationally, or to provide

"How
to use" instructions, because it is litterally impossible to know what is
being talked about.

I was interested in using the online Business letter templates, provided
through the Microsoft online mechanism.

Thank you for your patience and clarity. Being as their are "7" different
things a template can be, there are at least "7" very different sets of
instuctions relative to operating them. Getting an answer would require
knowing both which technology had been used, and how it had been

implemented,
and the creators intention relative to use.

thanks. David

"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote:

Yes, it is very difficult to get to the File New dialog in Word

2002/2003.
To do so, you must use File | New... and then select "On my computer"

in
the New Document task pane. The article to which you refer was probably
written for Word 2000 or earlier, where File | New... took you straight

to
the dialog (see

http://sbarnhill.mvps.org/WordFAQs/C...ngWord2002.htm
for instructions on regaining this functionality). In that dialog you

can
create a new template.

But that is not what you're asking. If you will tell us exactly which
template you're using (give the URL from which you downloaded it), we

can
tell you how it's supposed to be used. These templates are mostly

provided
by third parties (not Microsoft) and use a variety of different

formatting
options. Many templates use MacroButton NoMacro fields; these usually

have
text such as [Type name here], and when you click on them, they are

selected
and you overtype them. Other fields may be intended to be filled by a
UserForm (wizard) that runs when you create a new document based on the
template. But we don't have any way of knowing which of these techniques

(or
some other) has been used unless we know which template you're talking
about.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the

newsgroup so
all may benefit.

"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
To provide you with an example of what is not helpful... take the

following
linked document/instructions:

http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=22

I would copy and paste verbatim, but I think it may be protected...

(against
what I ask)

Open a blank template in Word by clicking File|New and be sure to

choose
the
TEMPLATE option before you click OK.

Aside from the fact that there is no TEMPLATE option in Word 2003

Do you understand at all? Not one entire instruction into the process,

and
it does not work. It isn't even possible as written.

I'm getting an irritating right hand panel with many icons and links,

even
headers and a search field, and nothing remotely resembling the

ability to
"choose TEMPLATES" and certainly no OK Button.

So, for clarity, again, I would suggest to MICROSOFT that they make

sure
available instructions actually are POSSIBLE to follow.

Hmmm. Is that really such a revolutionary idea?

David

"TheWheel" wrote:

Thank you to all in the chain.

However, I must assume I have been unclear.

I wish to use a pre-existing, Microsoft provided template, obtained

through
the "live" link to templates from inside Word 2003.

By "use" I mean to understand the significance of areas that are

"gray"
and
appear to be fields for input of my information.

I asked several very specific and very mechanical questions

concerning
whether these "gray" spots are intended only to be "overstriken" and
obliterated, or whether there may be some slightly more sufisticated

manner
available to obtain "replacements" of those values.

For all the effort Microsoft help demonstrates, and the efforts of

the
good
people above in this thread, I do not see anything addressing these

very
straightforward mechanical questions.

I am starting to suspect that Instead of using all caps for CLIENT

NAME
and
just typing over it, some people use macrobuttons, not to run macros

at
all,
but simply to be obliterated by typing over them. Seems like a gross

waste of
horsepower. Of course, this really doesn't address the order of

operations
required to change a document rather than the template when doing

so.

If I were addressing Microsoft (do "they" listen?) I would suggest

that
every help topic be reviewed with respect to: Why does one want to

do
this?
What other alternatives are there? From the beginning, what is done?

And
avoid generalities in the instructions portion of the help.

Exemplify by
picking an instance and making an example of it.

Thanks for all your efforts, and any future comments you may wish to

make.
-- David

"Shauna Kelly" wrote:

Hi Wheel

To add to what JoAnn and Charles said, it's worth bearing in mind

that
people create templates for different reasons. When you create a

new
document from a template, you'll see quite different things

depending
on
what the template creator had in mind. Here are some examples:

1. A template might be created to help people use appropriate

formatting.
When you create a new document from the template, the body of the

document
might be completely empty. You can just type the text you choose.

Businesses
create templates like this to help you use the standard formatting

the
business has chosen. So when you apply, say, the Heading 1 style,

Heading 1
might be defined as blue Arial 16pt. In a different template,

Heading
1
might be green Times New Roman 18pt.

Some templates like this have additional toolbars to help you

insert
standard pieces of text, or to apply styles (like Heading 1)

easily,
or to
provide extra functionality to Word.


2. A template might be set up to help you lay out a complex

document.
A
template for a newsletter or flyer might be like this. It may be

laid
out in
columns, it might have a banner on the front with place for a

logo.


3. A template might be set up as a form, for example an

Application
for
Leave form. So the template will include text (like "Name") and a

place for
you to type your name. Some form-type templates are simple forms

where
you
type where indicated. Some might be partly protected so the

template
will
only allow you to type in the right places. Some can be quite

sophisticated.
For example, when you type your name, the template might look up

your
name
in a database, find your supervisor's name and automatically add

the
supervisor's name to the document.


4. Other templates are designed to give you standard text as a

starting
point for your document. In a business, you might have a standard

contract
for buying goods and services. The template would hold all the

required text
of the contract, perhaps dozens of pages of text. It may have

places
for you
to type the name of the supplier, the price and so on. Templates

like
this
may or may not care much about formatting or layout.


5. Some templates use a wizard. When you create a new document

from
this
kind of template, a wizard opens that asks you for information,

and
then
puts the information into the new document. There are some

built-in
wizards
in Word. Try File New. In the Task pane at the right, click On

My
Computer. Now, on the Other Documents tab, click the Calendar

Wizard,
and
then click OK.


There are several templates built in to Word (which you can access

through
File New and "On my computer"). You can download templates from

Microsoft
at

http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/te...323741033.aspx.
And, of
course, you can create your own templates.

Hope this helps.

Shauna Kelly. Microsoft MVP.
http://www.shaunakelly.com/word


"TheWheel" wrote in message
...
Nothing I've seen starts at the begining and moves forward!

Simple! How do you use a template?

File Projects My Templates?

THEN WHAT?

Are there ANY fields, or do I just type stuff on?

If I need additional sets of things, what do I do? Just type

them
in, or
copy and paste the template lines?

How should I replace the template text? Search and replace?

Highlight and
Type? Type and delete?

How how how!






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